September 2005 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece (Part II) Technical Tips : Using Greek Software on your PC
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Poros
Saint Namedays in September. September Recipe.
Suggestions & Comments. Subscription Information.
September's Recipe:
Lamb Souvlaki

(with Lemon Rice)



Serves 4
 

Lamb Souvlaki
Ingredients:
1 pound shank portion of lamb,
cut into 11/2- to 2-inch cubes
to yield 12 pieces
8 cherry tomatoes
2 green peppers, seeded and
cut in 1 1/2-inch squares
2 small zucchini, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 onion, cut into 1-inch wedges
Marinade
Juice of 1 medium lemon (about
1/4 cup)
Juice of 1 medium orange
(about 1/4 cup)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon dried oregano (preferably Greek rigani)
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Preparation:
 
1. Rinse the lamb cubes, and place in a shallow glass or plastic bowl along with the tomatoes, green peppers, zucchini, and onion.

2.  Combine the marinade ingredients in a small bowl, then pour the mixture over the lamb and vegetables. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours, tossing occasionally.

3. Remove the marinated ingredients from the refrigerator. Alternating the lamb, tomatoes, green pepper, zucchini, and onion, thread them on 4 long metal skewers alternating with vegetables. Place the skewers on a rack set in a broiler pan, and place under the broiler, about 3 inches from the heat source. Cook about 10 minutes,
occasionally basting with the marinade, then turn and continue to broil another 10 minutes, or until the lamb is nicely browned.

4. Transfer the cooked souvlaki to a platter and serve immediately.
 
Nutritional Facts (PER SERVING)
Calories: 221 Carbohydrates: 9.4 g Cholesterol: 74 mg
Fat: 5.7 g Fiber: 2 g Protein: 25 g Sodium: 74 mg

 
Lemon Rice
Ingredients:
1 cup long-grain white rice (preferably Uncle Ben's brand)
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
2 cups water
1/2 teaspoon shredded lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon shredded orange peel

Preparation:
 
1. Place all of the ingredients except the lemon peel and orange peel in a 2-quart pot. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low, and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until all of the liq¬uid has been absorbed.

2.  Stir in the lemon peel and orange peel, and serve as is or with plain nonfat yogurt.
 
Nutritional Facts (PER SERVING)
Calories: 172 Carbohydrates: 41 g Cholesterol: 0 mg
Fat: 1 g Fiber: 0.2 g Protein: 3 g Sodium: 0 mg

 

Excerpts from: "Secrets of Fat-Free Greek Cooking", by Elaine Gavalas


Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?

 

Labor Day Savings on Books and Music!

A special offer exclusively for our mailing list subscribers. Save 10% on all book and music purchases made on Labor Day weekend starting Friday September 2, until Monday September 5, 2005. To take advantage of the offer use coupon code LABORDAY2005 during checkout (see note for restrictions*). 

Thank you for your patronage!
We know you have choices and thank you for making our store your choice for any product related to Greece.


Happy Labor Day!

 

* Please ensure that coupon is "applied" to your order before payment. When entering the code in the appropriate checkout box please press "Apply" for the discount to be applied to your order. Not valid with other offers. Cannot be applied to purchases made before or after the coupon's valid period. This is coupon is valid exclusively on sales made between September 2nd and  September 5, 2005
 

Watch Your Manners In Greece
Engagement and Marriage (Part II)

Continued from August's Issue...

- Until the 19th century, brides used just to wear a formal dress at their wedding. White wedding dresses were invented in the Victorian age (the 19th century).

- The tradition of "Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue" for brides is also kept in Greece.

- If a bride has been previously divorced or widowed, or if the wedding takes place at a registry office, then she may wear colour other than white.

- Wedding ceremonies should be avoided in the forty days before Easter, for fifteen days before the 15th of August, and for forty days before Christmas. These are days of Lent and for ecclesiastical classes - no weddings can take place. In olden times, there was a superstition concerning weddings in May and during leap years.

- A weekend wedding ceremony usually takes place between 11 and 12 o'clock in the morning or between 6 and 8 in the evening.

- The best time for marriage is during the summer, since it is a holiday period and people are more relaxed. For altruistic reasons, the future couple should avoid getting married over a weekend in the city, since their guests would rather spend a weekend away in the countryside or on an island.

- A good solution is for the couple to have their wedding on an island so that they can combine the ceremony with a holiday.

- The couple should arrange to meet the priest and ask him if any details concerning church decorations, photographers and video recordings would annoy him. The best man should also meet the priest.

- One, two or more priests or even the Archbishop himself may hold the ceremony. The Patriarch of Constantinople never performs wedding ceremonies.

- It is very important that the best man, the maid of honour, the groom and the bridesmaids arrive on time, which means 30-40 minutes in advance. Friends and relatives should already be in church. As soon as the bride arrives they should all stand up.

- The best man stands on the right side of the groom and a little behind him, and the maid of honour stands on the left side of the bride on the same level as the best man. The bridesmaids stay behind them, equally shared on each of the couple's sides.

- The bride's family stands on the left, and the groom's family on the right. Even if the parents have divorced, they should stand next to each other unless they have re-married, in which case they stand next to their present spouses.

- The bride always arrives accompanied by her father or, if he is absent, by her brother or uncle. She should arrive in a dark coloured car decorated with white flowers. At certain weddings the bride's delay has caused tensions - for this reason she should arrive on time.

- The groom waits for the bride at the church's entrance.

- As soon as the bride arrives, the priest welcomes the couple and leads them in the church, chanting a hymn called "axion hesti."

- The priest stands in front of the "Fine gate" with the couple opposite him and the best man and maid of honour a bit further behind, on the left and right side of the couple.

- The bridesmaids hold lit candles decorated with flowers. This doesn't just make the scene more glorious, but it also symbolises the melting away of the couple's previous sins.

- In front of the couple is a table, on which lies the Book of Gospels, the silver tray with the wreaths, the wedding rings and the "nama" (red wine, a throwback to olden times where the couple received Holy Communion during the wedding service).

- No participation is required by guests and family. They stand behind the couple during the ceremony, which generally lasts about an hour.

- The priest reads the gospels in front of the Fine Gate, and then the ceremony begins with the hymns of engagement. The priest blesses the rings on top of the Book of Gospels, places them three times on the groom's and next the bride's forehead; while he is reading the engagement hymns, the best man puts the rings on the couple's fingers. Next comes the ceremony of crowning with wreaths.

- The rings symbolise eternal bonding. The couple is now considered bound together by God "so that no human can separate them."

- The priest blesses the wreaths on the Book of Gospels and touches them three times on the groom and bride's head. He then crosses them in the middle and hands them over to the best man, who also crosses the wreaths three times over the couple's heads.

- The wreaths symbolise the grace and glory of the church; they also serve as a metaphor that the merry couple shall be king and queen in their new home.

- Next, the priest gives the couple the wine goblet and each of them has three sips. Then comes "Hesaiah's dance" which takes place around the table, with the priest leading the way and the couple holding hands and following him. At the same time, the friends and relatives throw rice - so their marriage may take root - and rose petals - so the couple may have a life "sown with flowers."

- When this part is over, the priest reads the final two wishes and then, if he wishes, makes a small speech before he departs. Then the best man and the maid of honour greet the parents and siblings. The ceremony is now complete. They may then have commemorative pictures taken.

- The relatives congratulate the couple and kiss the Gospel Book and wedding wreaths. The other guests are not obliged to do so at this point.

to be continued...

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Technical Tips: Running Greek Software on a non-Greek Windows PC

One common problem we hear about through our customer service is the ability to run Greek Software on a PC bought in the US (or any other country than Greece). Although you may have installed Greek fonts on your system and you are able to read and write Greek on your system, you may not be able to "run" Greek software applications. When you run them, they seem to operate but any text in the application is replaced by unreadable characters. This problem is caused by the method the application was developed and it is associated with what is known as non-unicode characters.

Unicode is the method of writing text in software applications so it displays characters properly regardless of the "local" version of Windows. It describes what fonts are used in an application and how they should be displayed on a system that uses any other language than the one the application is using. Older programs and some newer software applications may not use Unicode causing the problems outlined above. The instructions below will show you how to setup your system to use Greek fonts for software that does not use Unicode. Please do note that it may affect some of your other applications present so when you are done using the Greek application that caused you to change these settings, apply this instructions in reverse to cancel the changes. The instructions below are for a Windows XP system but the steps are similar for Windows 2000 systems as well.

Setting your non-unicode fonts to Greek

Note: Greekshops.com does not endorse or supports changing any computer settings on your system. Proceed at your own risk!

1. In the “Control Panel” select the icon Regional and Language Options



2. Under “Regional and Language Options” select the “Advanced” tab:

3. Under the “Advanced” section, change the Language for non-Unicode programs to Greek.
 

4. Windows XP will ask you to restart your system for the installation to complete.

Please note: Some non-Unicode applications that use English characters may require that you switch the language back to English for their proper operation. To do that follow the same instructions and in step 3 change the language to “English”

 
 What's New!!!
 Greek CDs & DVDs
Thalassa Club 2005 + bonus dvd

Thalassa Club 2005 + bonus dvd
Radio Heaven 16 super hits!

Radio Heaven 16 super hits!
Fame Story 3  Part Two: The Album (3CD Set)

Fame Story 3 Part Two: The Album (3CD Set)
 
Spiritual Icons chill-out experience George Chatzis

Spiritual Icons chill-out experience George Chatzis
Vicky Mosholiou 40 Hronia Limited Edition (4CD) - 85 greatest hits

Vicky Mosholiou 40 Hronia Limited Edition (4CD) - 85 greatest hits
Antonis Vardis Oi filoi mou ki Ego (2CD) best of + 1 new track

Antonis Vardis Oi filoi mou ki Ego (2CD) best of + 1 new track
Giorgos Xanthiotis Chiculata/Chocolate

Giorgos Xanthiotis Chiculata/Chocolate
Toy Story 1 & 2 (2Pack) - DVD (Pal Zone & Zone 2)

Toy Story 1 & 2 (2Pack) - DVD (Pal Zone & Zone 2)
 
Alexander Director

Alexander Director's Cut DVD (NTSC) Wide Screen Special Edition 2 Disc Set
Alexander Director

Alexander Director's Cut DVD (NTSC) Full Screen
 Books (In English and Greek), Calendars & Software
Euro 2004 Championship PIcture Book

Euro 2004 Championship Picture Book
(coming soon)
Ancient Greek Currency

Dear Drahma...Goodbye , In Greek

(coming soon)
Running with Pheidippides : Sylanos Kyriakides, The Miracle Marathoner

Running with Pheidippides : Sylanos Kyriakides, The Miracle Marathoner
The Virgin Suicides

The Virgin Suicides
 
An Accidental Greek Wedding by Carol Grace

An Accidental Greek Wedding by Carol Grace
Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides
Sofie Metrolpolis by Tori Carrington

Sofie Metrolpolis by Tori Carrington
Olympia 420 The Quest for Peace by J.B. Dath

Olympia 420 The Quest for Peace by J.B. Dath
The Oxford Greek Dictionary -- Paperback US Edition

The Oxford Greek Dictionary -- Paperback US Edition
Ancient Greece 2006 Calendar

Ancient Greece 2006 Calendar
 
 Ancient Greek Themes Magnets
Ancient Greek (Apollo) Apollon Magnet

Ancient Greek (Apollo) Apollon Magnet
Ancient Greek Demetra Magnet

Ancient Greek Demetra Magnet
Ancient Greek Hestia Magnet

Ancient Greek Hestia Magnet
Ancient Greek Zeus Magnet

Ancient Greek Zeus Magnet
Ancient Greek Magnet 13

Ancient Greek Magnet 13
Ancient Greek Warrior Magnet 14

Ancient Greek Warrior Magnet 14
Ancient Greek Warrior Magnet 15

Ancient Greek Warrior Magnet 15
Ancient Greek Warrior Helmet Magnet

Ancient Greek Warrior Helmet Magnet
Ancient Greek Lady Justice (Themis) Magnet

Ancient Greek Lady Justice (Themis) Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Athena holding an owl Magnet

Ancient Greek Athena holding an owl Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Artemis Magnet

Ancient Greek Artemis Magnet
Ancient Greek Magnet 20

Ancient Greek Magnet 20
Ancient Greek Charioteer Magnet

Ancient Greek Charioteer Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Hippocrates Magnet

Ancient Greek Hippocrates Magnet
Ancient Greek Socrates Magnet

Ancient Greek Socrates Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Magnet 26

Ancient Greek Magnet 26
Ancient Greek Nike Magnet

Ancient Greek Nike Magnet
Ancient Greek Minoan Snake Goddess Magnet

Ancient Greek Minoan Snake Goddess Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Bull

Ancient Greek Bull's Head Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Poseidon Magnet

Ancient Greek Poseidon Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Magnet 30

Ancient Greek Magnet 30
Ancient Greek Caryatides - Erechtheum Temple Magnet

Ancient Greek Caryatides - Erechtheum Temple Magnet
Ancient Greek Horse Head Magnet

Ancient Greek Horse Head Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Magnet 34

Ancient Greek Magnet 34
Ancient Greek Centaur Magnet

Ancient Greek Centaur Magnet
Ancien Greek Parthenon Magnet

Ancien Greek Parthenon Magnet
Ancient Greek Achilles Magnet

Ancient Greek Achilles Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Ares Magnet

Ancient Greek Ares Magnet
Ancient Greek Discus Thrower Magnet

Ancient Greek Discus Thrower Magnet
Ancient Greek Magnet 41

Ancient Greek Magnet 41
Ancient Greek Warrior Mask Magnet

Ancient Greek Warrior Mask Magnet
Ancient Greek Magnet 43

Ancient Greek Magnet 43
Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks Magnet

Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Medusa Mask Magnet

Ancient Greek Medusa Mask Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Hera Magnet

Ancient Greek Hera Magnet
Ancient Greek Athena Magnet

Ancient Greek Athena Magnet
Ancient Greek Aphrodite - Venus Magnet

Ancient Greek Aphrodite - Venus Magnet
 
Ancient Greek Socrates Magnet

Ancient Greek Socrates Magnet
   

  Featured Destination: Poros


At the very edge of the Saronic gulf, clinging to the east coast of the Peloponnese, Poros is more like a peninsula than an island. 29 nautical miles from Piraeus, 23 sq. km. in area, it has 43 km. of coast and a population of 3, 929. Boats from Piraeus come here via Aegina and Methana, as do the hydrofoils. There is also a direct link with Galatas on the coast of the Peloponnese. Connections with the islands of Hydra and Spetses and, during the summer months, hydrofoils to Tolo, Nauplion and Hermione and twice a week to Leonidion, Kyparissia and Monemvasia. A verdant island with some hills (highest peak Vigla, 390 m. a.s.l.), it is an ideal spot for quiet holidays and romantic excursions.
    
Poros actually comprises two islands, linked by a very narrow isthmus. In antiquity these were known as Sphairia and Kalaureia, the latter being the birthplace of Theseus, according to mythological tradition. Here too one of the greatest orators of antiquity, the Athenian Demosthenes, met his death. Throughout the 7th century BC Poros was the centre (Kalaureia) of an amphictyony of seven cities. In the ensuing centuries its fate was much the same as that of the other islands. It played an active role in the Greek War of Independence in 1821 and the first naval dockyard was installed here in 1830.

In antiquity Poros was the centre of the Amphictyony of Kalaureia and seat of the very important sanctuary of Poseidon, which has been revealed in the course of excavations on the southeast side of the island, 8 km. from the main town. Virtually no traces remain of the famous temple of Poseidon in which the orator Demosthenes sought refuge and committed suicide by taking poison. However, from this area, known as Palatia by the locals, there is a unique view over the open sea and the coast of Troizinia opposite. About half an hour to the south of the ancient sanctuary is the monastery of Zoodochos Pege (Life-giving source). The dominant feature in the monastery church is its gilded iconostasis which dates to the 18th century. Poros is an island small enough for one to ramble over, to enjoy its shores and sea, particularly on the south side, as well as its capital, Poros, which still remains a charming island town with its two-storey houses, waterfront cafes, patisseries and restaurants, not to mention its clock-tower. There is also an Archaeological Museum. Poros has a distinctive ambience, due in large part to its green natural environment and many trees, often growing right at the water's edge. One of the loveliest spots on the island is the west coast (Megalo Neorio). There are day trips from Poros to the archaeological sites of the Argolid (Epidaurus, Nauplion, Mycenae) and excursions to Troizinia with its remains of ancient Troezen where the tragic myth of Hyppolytos and Phaedra was enacted. Lemonodassos (lemon forest), east of Galatas is an area full of orage and lemon groves and at nearby Alyki the islanders usually bathe. Equally beautiful, however are the coves of Askeli and Monastiri. All beaches can be reached by bus and for those with a boat there are any number of unfrequented beaches and nearby islets. Accommodation is available in hotels, pensions, rented rooms and furnished flats.

 

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Going to Live and Work in Greece

Going to Live and Work in Greece
2005 edition

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece - A Guide to the Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Greece - A Guide to the
Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Cruise Greece DVD

Cruise Greece DVD

 Saints' Namedays in September

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
 
 
  1
Simeon
2 3
Anthimou
4
Moisi,
Ermionis
5
Zaxariou
6 7 8
Gennisi tis Theotokou
9
Ioakeim & Annis
 
10


 

11

12

 

13
Korniliou,
Aristeidou
 
14
Ypsosi tou Timiou Staurou
15
Nikita

 
16
Eyfimias
17
Sofias, Pisteos, Agapis, Elpidas
 
18
Eumeniou,
Ariadnis
 
19
 
20
Eustathiou
21
 
22
Foka
23
Sullipsi Prodromou
 
24
Theklas
25
Eyfrosinis
26
Metastasi Ioannou Euaggelistou
27
Kallistratou
 
28 29
Kuriakou
30
 



 

 


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
Want to know more about Orthodox Saints?
Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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