July 2005 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece Technical Tips : Writing and Reading Greek
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Nafpaktos
Saint Namedays in July July Recipe.
Suggestions & Comments. Subscription Information.
July's Recipe:
Midopilafo

(Mussels with rice)



Serves 4-6
 

Ingredients:
2lbs/1kg fresh mussels
1 scant cup/200ml Greek extra virgin olive oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 scant cup/200 ml dry white wine
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tomatoes, peeled and diced small
2 1/4 cups / 450g rice
1 tbsp flat-leaved parsley, finely chopped
1 tbsp dill, fineely chopped
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:
 
Wash the mussels, scrub them thoroughly, and discard any that are already open. Heat the olive oil in a pan and saute the onions. Add the mussels and a little water and bring to a boil. Discard the mussels that do not open. Pour in the white wine, add the tomatoes, and season with salt and pepper. Pour in enough water so the mussels are well covered, and simmer for about 15 minutes. Then add the rice, and cook until tender and the stock has been absorbed (add hot water if necessary). Arrange on a serving dish and garnish with parsley and dill.

 
Excerpts from: "Culinaria Greece", by Milona Marianthi

Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?
 
Technical Tips:

Reading and Writing Greek in computer applications including the web

One of the most common questions we receive is about the ability to read text written in Greek (online or in emails) on your computer. An extension of the question is how you can effectively write Greek text that others can also read properly. Unfortunately the method discussed below applies only to PCs running Windows XP and some older Windows versions (Win2k, ME, 98SE, 98, NT). For older versions of Windows, Mac, and Linux systems, please drop us a note and we will be more than happy to send you the information applicable to your system.


Reading Greek

To read Greek text with the appropriate Greek letters and not using Latin characters (ASCII), you must install Greek fonts. The following line is a test; if you can read it, you already have Greek fonts. If you cannot read it, you need those fonts.

Αυτή η γραμμή είναι γραμμένη στα Ελληνικά

Windows XP usually contains all the necessary font sets and you are already reading the above line, unless your browser overrides the fonts suggested by this webpage. In the latter case you need to select the character set ISO-8859-7. These fonts follow the standard ELOT-928, which is internationally known as ISO-8859-7 and is the most compact way to write texts in Greek.


Writing Greek

In order to be able to write in Greek, there are two requirements: a mapping or layout of the keys of the keyboard to the corresponding Greek characters, and a method for switching between different types of keyboard layouts. In Windows XP you can meet these requirements as follows:

Under "Start" select Control panel and double click "Regional and Language Settings". Select the tab "Language" and under "Text services and input laguages" click on "Details".

Under "Installed services" click on "Add". Select as "Input language" "Greek" and pick the "Keyboard layout/IME" of your choice - the default is fine. Close the last window by clicking "OK".

In the "Text Services and Input Languages" window, under "Preferences" click on "Language Bar" and select "Show the Language bar on the desktop" so you can tell at any time which keyboard layout is selected for the application that is active. Click "OK" to return to the previous window.

Under "Preferences" click on "Key Settings" to open the "Advanced Key Settings" window. Under "Hot keys for input languages" make your selections for accessing or switching to a given keyboard layout. People who use only two keyboard layouts usually just use one key combination to toggle between the two languages.

Under "Change Key Sequence" you can select the combination of CTRL + SHIFT or Left Alt + SHIFT, the latter choice being more common, for toggling between input languages. Close this window by clicking "OK".

Close the "Advanced Key Settings" by clicking "OK".

Close the "Text Services and Input Languages" window by clicking "OK".

Close the "Regional and Language Options" window by clicking "OK".

You should now be able to write Greek characters in most applications.



Reference: Hellenic Resources Network - Guide to Greek Fonts
 

 

 

 



 

Watch Your Manners In Greece
Flirting and Love

Continued from June's Issue...

- The Greek word Eros has been adopted by many languages to express sexual love. In Christianity, the sexual act is for procreation, but it is useful to have some guidelines on etiquette when conducting a sexual affair (or trying to avoid erotic overtures).

- Men wish to be the first in a woman's love life. Women seem to be more philosophical in this case, wishing to be the last in a man's love life.

- There are many different kinds of flirting, ranging from light-hearted fun to determined sexual advances. Greek summer is the ideal time for meeting and dating; there are, however, some inviolable moral rules no matter how laid-back and free we may feel. For example, we should never conduct serious flirtation with a woman who is married or already in a relationship.

- A woman may not be the "second, weaker sex," but we ought to treat her as though she is. This means that we should always be polite, kind and courteous, we should open the car door for her, help her put on or take off her coat, offer her the best seat in the restaurant - in short, we try to make her feel like a queen. These gestures, when done naturally and not pretentiously, are the best way to express our feelings.

- Flirting is no longer monopolized by men. After the sexual revolution of the 70s many women take the initiative and approach a man. However, sociologist Christine Menie believes that "Man-hunting has its limits: during her 20s it is fun, during her 30s it is tiring, and during her 40s it is stressful."

- One of the most common ways to approach someone is through a dinner invitation. If a lady goes on a first date, but does not wish to go on a second, it is advisable for her to insist on paying her share of bill.

- If she is uninterested in flirting any further, she should make it clear. Procrastination and constantly putting off a date become exhausting.

- Dates can now be arranged through the Internet or a dating club. Some succeed and end in marriage, others fail. We should never be scornful about such meetings. It's not the means we use to meet somebody but the kind of relationship that is formed that is important.

- When a lady or a gentleman feels annoyed by unwanted attentions, he/she should show clearly his or her disinterest.

- One should not lie about one's age, profession, further education, name or marital status. If married, one should let it be known from the start and avoid any flirtation, no matter how much one might feel attracted to the other person.

- Everything comes to him who waits! This applies, of course, provided we do not overdo it. If the person we are interested in doesn't respond to our efforts, we should accept and give up.

- Sometimes it so happens that a lady sitting at a neighboring table in a restaurant is looking at us. A gentleman should never flirt with a woman who is escorted. If, however, he is interested in her and it is clear that she is on her own, it is acceptable to send her a note and a business card as discreetly as possible. If she is interested, she will telephone.

- If we are escorted by a lady and we realize that another man is staring at her, the appropriate reaction is to say as politely as possible "Excuse me, this lady is with me." If, however, he persists, we should leave and go elsewhere.

- It takes two to tango when it comes to lovemaking - both parties must be willing. To be more precise, they should be sober, informed, actively involved and consenting. If not, it is called rape.

- We respect our partner by our cleanliness. We should always wash before and after a sexual act.

- We should avoid leaving marks such as love bites or scratches on our partner's body. It is not necessary for the whole world to know what passionate lovers we are, nor is it fair to force our companion to walk around wearing a scarf (or other such cover-up), especially in the middle of August or during a heat wave.

- We shouldn't make any negative comments about our companion's body or appearance.

- It is important to telephone the day after sexual intercourse to show our continued interest. It is customary for the man to call first, although nowadays the opposite may also happen.

- In Greece, the sexual revolution also brought about a balance in sexual relationships. However, tradition hasn't been completely abolished. For example, there are still many women who believe that "men want sex and we give it to them," instead of believing that it is an enjoyable mutual experience.

- Hypocrisy during sexual intercourse may lead to mistaken expectations and disappointment.

- In Ancient Athens two philosophers, Diogenes (the cynical) and voluptuous Aristippus fell in love with the same concubine, gorgeous looking Layda. When Diogenes told Aristippus that living with a concubine is shameful, the latter replied "Do you consider it shameful to live in a house where others have lived before you?"
When another friend assured Aristippus' that Layda didn't love him, the wise man said: "Neither the wine nor the fish, which I delightfully enjoy, love me, but I still find pleasure in enjoying them."

to be continued...

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis
 

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  Featured Destination: Nafpaktos (Lepanto)


     
Modern, busy, straggling Nafpaktos is the last place you would expect to suddenly come across a tiny medieval port, so complete it only lacks a chain placed across its mouth every evening. The delightful port is a prelude to the imposing castle set high above the town in a beautiful forest of pines. Inhabited by Locrians, the site was taken over by Athens in 455 BC and given to displaced Messenians. Even then it was an important supply depot for ships bound for Italy. Fortified again in Byzantine times, the Franks changed its name to Lepanto and used it as a stopover to the Holy Land; the Despot of Epirus used it when things were too hot in Epirus; and Albanian tribesmen just used it. Finally it came to the Venetians in 1407.Theydid the decorating, building one of the finest fortifications in Greece, and that in spite of the Turkish occupation after 1490.The core was the castle or Fortezza (open daylight hours), surrounded by walls and square and round towers; from here two walls descend to enclose the port, joined by four transverse walls to create five defensive zones. The walk up through impressive gates (and past two cafes built into the walls) is delightful and the view superb; a church of Profitis Elias, a Byzantine bath, cisterns and mosque still stand in the castle, Fortezza notwithstanding, the most famous battle hereabouts was fought on sea, not on land. In 1571, a Turkish admiral took on supplies here before what became the Battle of Lepanto,fought to the west, where a Western allied fleet under Emperor Charles V's son, Don Juan of Austria, dealt such a crippling blow to Turkish sea power that it turned the tide of Ottoman expansion in Europe, and incidentally spared the castle and the port for posterity. Cervantes lost an arm in the fray and left us the best description of the battle; other survivors told how confusion reigned at Lepanto from one end to the next; on some ships, heads rolled without mercy, while on others, Turks and Christians hurled lemons and oranges at one another, laughing.
The port area is about to be pedestrianized. It is framed by long, wide, shingle beaches; the western one, Psani, is the most sympathetic, and the eastern, Grymvovo, is fancier. Businesses are run by young people with New York and Sydney accents, the first generation of expatriates to return to Greece looking for streets paved with gold. They may find them when the Rio-Andirio suspension bridge (10 km west of town) makes Nafpaktos and the unexplored mountains beyond easy to reach.

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Going to Live and Work in Greece

Going to Live and Work in Greece
2005 edition

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece - A Guide to the Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Greece - A Guide to the
Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Cruise Greece DVD

Cruise Greece DVD

 Saints' Namedays in July

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

 

 

 

 
1
Kosma & Damianou
2 3
Yakinthou
4 5 6 7
Kuriakis
8
Theofilou / Prokopiou
9
Pagratiou
 

10

11
Eufimias / Olgas
 

12
Veronikis
13 14
Nikodimou

 
15 16
Athinogenous
17
Marinas
18
Aimilianou
19 20
Profiti Elia
21 22
Marias Magdalinis
 
23 24
25 26
Parakseuis
27
Panteleimonos
28 29
Kallinikou
30


 
31
Iosif Arimatheias


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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