October 2006 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: Hospitality Special Feature : Greek Mountain Tea
What's New!!!! Featured Destination : Tenos 
Saint Namedays in October October 's Recipe : Halva / Semolia Pudding 
Suggestions & Comments Subscription Information
Ingredients:
For the Syrup:
- 3 cups water
- 2 cups fresh orange juice
- 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
- 2 cups granulated sugar
- 1 cinnamon stick
- 1 piece fresh lemon peel
- 1/2 tbsp cloves
For the Halva:
- 1 cup olive oil

 

- 2 1/4 cups fine semolina
- 1/4/ cup sliced almonds, finely chopped
1/4 cup pine nuts
To Serve:

- 1 tsp cinnamon
 

Monastiri Coarse (Thick) Semolina from Greece Monastiri Coarse
Semolina from Greece



Preparation:

To make the Syrup: place the water, orange juice, lemon juice and sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Add the cinnamon stick, lemon peel and cloves. Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Allow to cool, then remove the cinnamon stick, lemon peel and cloves by passing through a fine sieve.

To make the Halva: heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over meduim heat. Add the semolina, almonds and pine nuts. Cook the mixture over a low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture begins to turn a golden color or for about 15 to 20 minutes, being careful not to burn the mixture. Remove from the heat.

Carefully pour the syrup over the semolina mixture, stirring with wooden spoon. Cover with a kitchen cloth and leave for 10 minutes to let the mixture absorb the syrup. Spoon the mixture into individual bowls and allow to cool. Before serving, sprinkle each bowl with cinnamon.

(Serves 4)
 

Excerpts from: "Modern Greek: 170 Contemporary Recipes from the Mediterranean "
Watch Your Manners In Greece
Hospitality

Continued from September's issue...

- Unfortunately some things in life are not passed on through the generations: What today passes as hospitality barely resembles all that was entailed by that word in Ancient Greek households. Selfishness, the tendency towards privacy and absorption in personal comfort have stopped people from keeping an open house for foreigners and strangers. Weekend breaks and "holidays in the countryside" are the only forms of hospitality left.

- For many people, hospitality ends where racism begins. We should be more hospitable towards immigrants in our country, bearing in mind that we ourselves have been in a similar position to these poor foreigners - thousands of Greeks emigrated to Germany 40 years ago and to the United States of America 80 years ago.

- Many ancient rules of hospitality do still apply today, however. All guests are considered honored members of the family. They have the best seats at the dinner table, they are offered the best room to sleep in, and the hosts are glad to fulfill any request they may have.

- We shouldn't invite people whom we have just met for a long stay. A weekend is more than sufficient.

- The length of a guest's stay, including dates of arrival and departure, should be clearly pre-arranged.

- When arriving at somebody's house as a guest, we should always offer a gift. After departure, we should send flowers to our hostess.

- When staying at somebody's country house, we should keep the family's schedule, especially as regards meal and bed times.

- Guests should not make overseas calls or call mobile phones from the house's landline.

- When we invite friends to stay, we should not subject them to a military regimen nor should we organise every second of our guest's stay. Good hosts are those who offer a flexible, lenient schedule for their guests.

- If we have challenged our guest to a tavli, chess, or tennis match, good manners do not oblige us to lose in order to prove that we are good hosts. We should play fair and just, so that both parties can enjoy the game.

- If, however, our co-player is a child or an elderly person, and the price is not too high for us topay, we may - if we wish - lose so as to cheer them up.

- When leaving the house, we make sure we have all our belongings with us. We do not wish to leave anything behind except good memories.

- We keep our mouths shut as far as the host family's secrets are concerned.

- We should send our host a "thank you" note. This is much better than making a phone call.

12 tips that make a good guest:
1. Guests should not "drop anchor" as soon as they arrive. A common Greek saying says, "A fish and a guest both stink after three days." A visitor must depart leaving his hosts with the desire to invite him again soon.
2. He should invite his hosts for dinner at a restaurant during his stay.
3. He should not be demanding and idiosyncratic, asking, for example, for a caviar and champagne breakfast.
4. He should not show that he is bored.
5. He should try and make himself useful, helping out with household chores, food shopping etc.
6. He should not take sides if his hosts are having a row.
7. He should let them "breathe" from time to time. Sometimes he should go out alone to visit a museum or an exhibition, for example.
8. He should not become over-familiar with family members. For example, it is unacceptable for him to call an elderly woman "granma."
9. He should not make negative comments about the house's tenants.
10. He should take care of the house's furniture and shouldn't swap things around at will, as if they were his own.
11. He should not accept invitations to other people's houses while he is a guest, unless his host is also invited.
12. He should think twice before bringing over a "one night stand" he met at a club.

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Special Feature: Greek Mountain Tea

Greek mountain tea can be found in almost every Greek household.  When the weather turns cooler and the first signs of an impending cold or cough manifest themselves, when the limbs aches, or when you just feel under the weather, a tea made from the dried stalks of Sideritis cretica has beneficial and curative effect.  The twigs are broken into pieces, which are then put into a pan of boiling water.  They are left over a low heat for at least five minutes to infuse rather than to simmer, and then strained straight into cups.  The addition of cinnamon sticks enhances the flavor still further.  The Greek ironwort is a medium-high shrub that has an upright form, with opposing, wooly leaves growing on straight, relatively non-branching stalks.  The plant manages to survive on sites with hot, dry summers.  Its small, yellow flowers are rather unobtrusive.  The botanical name Sideritis, derived from the Greek word  sideros, meaning iron, indicates this plant's areas of application in ancient medicine.  It was used externally for its anti-inflammatory and astringent properties in the case of "wounds from iron struck into limbs," and internally for its ability to strengthen the body's powers of resistance.  When the Venetians discovered the tea, they called it malotira because it "draws out the illness."


This special variety of ironwort, Sideritis cretica, thrives in the highlands of Greece and is considered particularly effective and aromatic among mountain tea connoisseurs

 
Greek Mountain Tea  Net Wt. 40 gr.

Greek Mountain Tea
Net Wt. 40 gr.


Break the stalks into pieces.  Pour over boiling water, cover, and quickly bring to a boil.  Leave to infuse to the desired strenght, then strain into cups.

Excerpt from: "Culinaria Greece" by Marianthi Milona
 

Don't Forget to Pick Up Your Greek Christmas Ornaments!!
Order your Greek Christmas ornaments in advance to ensure product availability.
 
Ancient Greek Parthenon Christmas Ornament 105_38gold

Ancient Greek Parthenon 
Ancient Greek Parthenon Christmas Ornament 105_38white

Ancient Greek Parthenon
 Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks Ornament 105_44gold

Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks
 
 Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks Ornament 105_44white

Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks
Ancient Greek Ionic Column Christmas Ornament 105_46gold

Ancient Greek Ionic Column
Ancient Greek Ionic Column Christmas Ornament 105_46white

Ancient Greek Ionic Column

 What's New!!!
Featured New Additions
 
Greek Soccer Team Mug Cups

Display your Greek team's colors with pride! A mug with the logo of your favorite Greek soccer team! A perfect gift for any Greek soccer fan.
 
   
Modern Greek : 170 Contemporary Recipes from the Mediterranean

Delicious and Healthful, redolent of the flavors of the Mediterranean, and perfect for the way we like to eat today - it's no wonder that Greek food is so beloved. In homes and at restaurant tables around the world, its glorious heritage is being enjoyed more and more, with its classic flavors celebrated in a host of new and mouthwatering ways.

 

    

   
From Tapas to Meze by Joanne Weir

Life at the table in the sun-drenched communitites surrounding the Mediterranean has as much to do with feeding the heart and soul as the stomach. Peek into a crowded tapas bar of wander by a rustic outdoor taverna and you'll find people fathered together in lively conversation, sharing steaming bowls of pasta, tiny deep-fried fish, roasted sweet vegetables, and savory pizzas.

 

    

 

Music & DVDs
Giorgos Mazonakis, Summer in Greece CD single

Giorgos Mazonakis, Summer in Greece CD single
 
Eleana Papaioannou, Fila Me

Eleana Papaioannou, Fila Me
Mykonos 7 : Night & Day (2CD)

Mykonos 7 : Night & Day (2CD)
Eurovision Song Contest : Athens 2006 2DVDs (PAL)

Eurovision Song Contest : Athens 2006 2DVDs (PAL)
 
Elena Paparizou, Mad Secret Concerts DVD (PAL)

Elena Paparizou, Mad Secret Concerts DVD (PAL)
 
 Books
From Tapas to Meze by Joanne Weir

From Tapas to Meze by Joanne Weir
Meze : Delicious Little Dishes from Greece and Lebanon

Meze : Delicious Little Dishes from Greece and Lebanon
  Modern Greek : 170 Contemporary Recipes from the Mediterranean

Modern Greek : 170 Contemporary Recipes from the Mediterranean
  Frappe Nation by Daniel Young

Frappe Nation by Daniel Young
 
  Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke
 
Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean

Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean
Alistair Sawday

Alistair Sawday's Special Places to Stay - Greece
Zoi Tou Pi by Yann Martel

Zoi Tou Pi by Yann Martel
To hroniko tis Narnia : To liontari, i magissa kai i ntoulapa

To hroniko tis Narnia : To liontari, i magissa kai i ntoulapa
Psahnontas ton Nemo in Greek

Psahnontas ton Nemo in Greek
Klassica Paramithia, 20 Classic Fairy Tales in Greek

Klassica Paramithia, 20 Classic Fairy Tales in Greek
Peekaboo!  Play time in Greek

Peekaboo! Play time in Greek
Oi Protes Mou 100 Lekseis in Greek

Oi Protes Mou 100 Lekseis in Greek
   
 T-shirts & Sweatshirts
Ancient Greece Hellas Tshirt Style 71_2006

Ancient Greece Hellas Tshirt Style 71_2006
 
Ancient Greece Hellas Sweatshirt Style 71_2006

Ancient Greece Hellas Sweatshirt Style 71_2006
 
  Ancient Greece Athens Tshirt Style 65_2006

Ancient Greece Athens Tshirt Style 65_2006
  Ancient Greece Athens Sweatshirt Style 65_2006

Ancient Greece Athens Sweatshirt Style 65_2006
  Ancient Greece Athena Tshirt 44

Ancient Greece Athena Tshirt 44
 
Ancient Greece Athena Sweatshirt 44

Ancient Greece Athena Sweatshirt 44
 
Ancient Greece Alexander the Great Tshirt Style 38

Ancient Greece Alexander the Great Tshirt Style 38
  Ancient Greece Alexander the Great Sweatshirt Style 38

Ancient Greece Alexander the Great Sweatshirt Style 38
 
  Ancient Greece Crete Tshirt Style 88_2006

Ancient Greece Crete Tshirt Style 88_2006
 
Ancient Greece Crete Sweatshirt Style 88_2006

Ancient Greece Crete Sweatshirt Style 88_2006
 
Ancient Greece Rhodes Tshirt Style 92_2006

Ancient Greece Rhodes Tshirt Style 92_2006
Ancient Greece Rhodes Sweatshirt Style 92_2006

Ancient Greece Rhodes Sweatshirt Style 92_2006
Ancient Greece Mykonos Tshirt Style 95_2006

Ancient Greece Mykonos Tshirt Style 95_2006
Ancient Greece Mykonos Sweatshirt Style 95_2006

Ancient Greece Mykonos Sweatshirt Style 95_2006
Greek Island Hellas Tshirt 135

Greek Island Hellas Tshirt 135
Greek Island Hellas Tshirt 135

Greek Island Hellas Tshirt 135
Greek Island Hellas Greece Tshirt 137_2006

Greek Island Hellas Greece Tshirt 137_2006
Greek Island Hellas Greece Sweatshirt 137_2006

Greek Island Hellas Greece Sweatshirt 137_2006
Greek Island Hellas Greek Tshirt 195_2006

Greek Island Hellas Greek Tshirt 195_2006
Greek Island Hellas Greek Sweatshirt 195_2006

Greek Island Hellas Greek Sweatshirt 195_2006
 
Eureka Tshirt 730_2006

Eureka Tshirt 730_2006
Eureka Sweatshirt 730_2006

Eureka Sweatshirt 730_2006

 
     
Women's Apparel
Koukla Swarovski Rhinestone Black Zippered Fleece Hoody

Koukla Swarovski Rhinestone Black Zippered Fleece Hoody
Koukla Long Sleeve Crew Neck Black

Koukla Long Sleeve Crew Neck Black
 
Koukla Long Sleeve Crew Neck Grey

Koukla Long Sleeve Crew Neck Grey
 
Greek Island Hellas Women

Greek Island Hellas Women's Tshirt Style 135B
 
Greek Island Hellas Greece Women

Greek Island Hellas Greece Women's Tshirt 137B_2006
Ancient Greek Warriors Women

Ancient Greek Warriors Women's Tshirt 10
 
Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Womens Tshirt Style 10016b

Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Womens
Tshirt Style 10016b
Olive Branches and Discus Womens Tshirt Style 10019b

Olive Branches and Discus Womens Tshirt
Style 10019b
 
Olive Branches and Parthenon Womens Tshirt Style 10020b

Olive Branches and Parthenon Womens Tshirt Style 10020b
Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Women

Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Women's
Tshirt Style 9
Greeek Islands Womens Tshirt Style 54b

Greeek Islands Womens
Tshirt Style 54b
 
Greeek Islands Womens Tshirt Style 64b

Greeek Islands Womens
Tshirt Style 64b
 
Greeek Islands Womens Tshirt Style 70b

Greeek Islands Womens
Tshirt Style 70b
Greece Dove Women

Greece Dove Women's Tshirt Style 469B_2006
 
 
 Children's T-shirts & Sweatshirts
Ancient Greek Warriors Children

Ancient Greek Warriors Children's Tshirt 10
 
Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Children

Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Children's Tshirt 10016B
Olive Branches and Discus Thrower Children

Olive Branches and Discus Thrower Children's Tshirt 10019B
Olive Branches and Parthenon Children

Olive Branches and Parthenon Children's Tshirt 10020B
Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Children

Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Children's Tshirt Style 9
Cat in the Greek Islands Children

Cat in the Greek Islands Children's Tshirt 54b
Greek Islands Children

Greek Islands Children's
Tshirt 70B

 
Greek Island Hellas Children

Greek Island Hellas Children's Tshirt Style 135B
 
Greek Island Hellas Greece Children

Greek Island Hellas Greece Children's Tshirt 137B_2006
Greece Dove Children

Greece Dove Children's Tshirt Style 469B_2006
Ancient Greek Warriors Children

Ancient Greek Warriors Children's Sweatshirt 10
 
Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Children

Olive Branches and Marathon Runners Children's Sweatshirt 10016B
Olive Branches and Discus Thrower Children

Olive Branches and Discus Thrower Children's Sweatshirt 10019B
Olive Branches and Parthenon Children

Olive Branches and Parthenon Children's Sweatshirt 10020B
 
Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Children

Pythia at the Oracle of Delphi Children's Sweatshirt Style 9
Greeek Islands Children

Greeek Islands Children's Sweatshirt Style 53b
Cat in the Greek Islands Children

Cat in the Greek Islands Children's Sweatshirt 54B
 
Greeek Islands Children

Greeek Islands Children's Sweatshirt Style 64b
Greek Islands Children

Greek Islands Children's Sweatshirt 65B
Greek Islands Children

Greek Islands Children's Swaetshirt 66B
 
Greek Islands Children

Greek Islands Children's Sweatshirt 67B
 
Greeek Islands Children

Greeek Islands Children's Sweatshirt Style 68b
Greek Islands Children

Greek Islands Children's Sweatshirt 69B
 
Greeek Islands Children

Greeek Islands Children's Sweatshirt Style 70b
Greek Island Hellas Children

Greek Island Hellas Children's Sweatshirt Style 135B
Greek Island Hellas Greece Children

Greek Island Hellas Greece Children's Sweatshirt 137B_2006
 
Greece Dove Children

Greece Dove Children's Sweatshirt Style 469B_2006
     
 More Additions!
Greek Fruit Jelly Candy 1 lb.

Greek Fruit Jelly Candy 1 lb.
 
Papadopoulou Caprice - Strawberry (250g)

Papadopoulou Caprice - Strawberry (250g)
 
  Socrates Aromatics Soap Assortment (9 bars)

Socrates Aromatics Soap Assortment (9 bars)

 
  Greek Aromatic Soap Gift Package (4 bars)

Greek Aromatic Soap Gift Package (4 bars)
 
  Name Mug with Greek Candy Gift Package

Name Mug with Greek Candy Gift Package
Decorative Wall Ornament of the Crucifix 121314

Decorative Wall Ornament of the Crucifix 121314
Decorative Wall Ornament of Virgin Mary 121313

Decorative Wall Ornament of Virgin Mary 121313
Decorative Wall Ornament with Greek Flag 121314

Decorative Wall Ornament with Greek Flag 121314
Evil Eye Star Paper Weight

Evil Eye Star Paper Weight
Children

Children's Evil Eye Bracelet P04

  Featured Destination: Tenos

GEOGRAPHY. Tenos, the Holy island of the Virgin, lies between Andros (700 m.), Mykonos (8 nautical miles) and northeast of Syros (13 nautical miles). It is the fourth largest of the Cyclades, after Naxos, Andros and Paros, covering an area of 194 sq. km., with 106 km. of coast and 85 nautical miles from Piraeus. Its population is 7,730. There are daily car and passenger ferries from Piraeus and Rafina (62 nautical miles), as well as links with Andros, Mykonos, Paros, los and Santorini. The island's capital and harbor, Tenos, is a convenient centre for visiting the other villages on the island, large and small. Tenos is essentially mountainous (highest peak Tsikinas, 713 m. a.s.l.) with a few small, fertile valleys. Its coast, mainly steep in the east, follows the configuration of the land, forming small bays, the largest and most sheltered of which is the gulf of Panormos on its northeast side. Tenos has its own, distinctive Cycladic charm: lush, verdant vegetation, small villages with snow-white houses, ornate dovecotes and numerous tiny chapels. There is limited touristic development and Tenos is just right for quiet holidays.

HISTORY. In antiquity the island was called Ophiousa. We have very little information about Tenos in prehistoric times though excavations (Vryokastro) have shown that it was inhabited in the Bronze Age, during the period of the Cycladic civilization. Throughout antiquity, as indeed today, it was famed for its marble and there is a tradition of stone-carving. In the 8th and 7th century BC it was under the domination of Eretria. During the Persian Wars it was captured by the Medes, liberated after the battle of Marathon and took part in the naval battle of Salamis. It achieved its zenith in the 3rd century BC, while in the 2nd it was a naval station of the Rhodians. Tenos was taken by the Romans in 88 BC and decimated by Mithridates. During the Byzantine period it faded into obscurity and with the Fall of Constantinople to the Franks it, like the rest of the Cyclades, came under the control of Venice, which ceded it to the Ghisi family. The Venetians built a fortress on the pinnacle of a steep cliff on its south coast. Within its walls the Venetian nobles resided, while outside, at Exoburgo, the peasants dwelt. During the Venetian occupation many of the islanders adopted the Catholic faith. In 1538 it was pillaged by Barbarossa but did not fall to the Turks until 1715. Between 1770 and 1774 it was under Orloff. Many Greek refugees from Psara and Chios fled to Tenos during the Revolution of 1821. In 1822 the miraculous icon of the Virgin was discovered. It was in the harbor of Tenos that the Greek warship "Elli" was torpedoed by the Italians in 1940.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS. Tenos, the island's capital, stands on its south side. It developed after the Venetians' retreat in 1715 and is a typical island town with whitewashed houses and narrow streets. The most important monument there, and indeed on the entire island, is the church of the Virgin, built in 1823 following the discovery of her icon. It is an imposing edifice of white marble and has several ancillary buildings. The Museum of Tenian Artists and Modern Greek Painters is well worth a visit, with works by contemporary Greek artists, while in the Art Gallery there is a collection of reproductions of works by Renaissance painters. There is a rich library in the monastery and sacristy with vestments and ecclesiastical plate. Exhibited in the Archaeological Museum are finds from sites all over the island. East of the town of Tenos is the monastery of the Holy Trinity (1610) where there is a small collection of local folk art, and even further east is the Venetian harbor of Aghios loannis (Ai Yannis sto Porto). In the environs of the town and in the villages there is a proliferation of dovecotes; elaborately embellished, they constitute one of the distinctive features of the island. 5 km. northeast of Tenos is Triantaros, a picturesque village with a church of the Taxiarchs. Slightly to the north is Dyo Choria (two villages) built on a richly wooded hillside. From here one has a view of the nearby convent of Kechrovouniou, dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, where-there is the cell of Hosia Pelagia, the nun who dreamt of the finding of the icon of the Virgin Evangelistria. There is a little chapel consecrated to her memory, as well as several other smaller churches and handicraft workshops. 2 km. northeast are the villages of Mesi and Steni. In the immediate vicinity is the monastery of St. Anthony with its magnificent Byzantine iconostasis. From Steni one can proceed to the villages of Myrsini and Falatados. Remains of the Venetian castle and medieval town are preserved 3 km. from Steni, at Xobourgo. In addition to the Venetian ramparts and ruined castle, some ancient Greek remains can be discerned (8th/7th century BC) in the area between Xobourgo and Xynara. The Ursuline convent at Loutra was renowned for its school. The next village, Komi, is one of the largest on Tenos and has many authentic Tenian houses in good condition. A minor road leads to Kolymbithra, one of the most delightful beaches on the island's east side. From Xobourgo one can also visit Kampos, and further northwards one passes through the villages of Tarabados with its ornate dovecotes and Kardiani with its quaint houses and little churches. Immediately after Kardiani is the village of Ysternia, where many modern artists live, and northwest of here is one of the oldest churches on Tenos, that of St. Athanasios (1453) and the monastery of the Virgin Katapoliani (1786). The largest and perhaps loveliest village on the island is Pyrgos, (Panormos) with a long tradition in stone-carving and painting, birthplace of many Greek artists. There is a museum of works by Yannoulis Chalepas in his family home and there are ateliers of sculpting, painting and wood-carving. The houses in Pyrgos are characterized by their ornate exteriors particularly of carved marble. There are also elaborately decorated fountains and several interesting churches, of St. Eleousa and of the Presentation of the Virgin. About 3 km. distant from Pyrgos is the picturesque bay of Panormos which is quickly growing into a holiday resort. 5km. northwest of Pyrgos, at Marlas is the nowadays abandoned monastery of Hosia Xeni.

Northwest of the town of Tenos is Kionia (3 km.), in an attractive setting with a unique view of the open sea. Excavations have brought to light ruins of the 3rd century BC temple, initially for the worship of Poseidon and later of Amphitrite, one of the major cult centers in the Cyclades in antiquity.
Several of Tenos' shores are ideal for swimming and fishing, as well as sea sports. The beaches at Aghios Phokas, Kionia, Ai Yannis sto Porto, Kolymbithra, the bay of Kardiani and Ysternia are particularly beautiful, and further north is the bay of Panormos. All are accessible by car. One can shoot birds and small game in the island's mountainous hinterland. For those with a boat there are plenty of beaches to explore. Refueling stations in the harbor.

 Travel & Museum Guides for your trip in the area

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke
Alistair Sawday

Alistair Sawday's Special Places to Stay - Greece
Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean

Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean
Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)

Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)
National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)

National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)

 Saints' Name days in October

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
            1
Ananiou / Pomanou Melodou
2
Kuprianou / Ioustiounis
3
Dionisiou Aeropagitou
4
Ierotheou
5
Xaritinis
6
Thoma
7
Poluxroniou

8
Iakovou

9
Eulampiou

10 11 12 13 14 15
Loukianou
16 17 18
Louka
19
Kleopatras
20
Artemiou / Gerasimou Kefallhnias
21
Sokratous
22
23
Iakovou

 
24
Sevastianis 
 
25
 
26
Dimitriou Myrovlitou
27
Nestoros
28
Agias Skepis
 
 29
30
Zinoviou

 
31          


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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