Greek products and items from Greece
 May 2005 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece (Part I) Technical Tips : Unsolicited Email
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Mystras
Saint Namedays in May. May Recipe.
Suggestions & Comments. Subscription Information.
May's Recipe:
Shrimp and Caper Salad



Serves 4-6
 

Ingredients:
2 pounds medium shrimp, peeled,deveined, and tails cut off
1 clove garlic, minced
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 scallions, white and tender green parts, finely chopped
1 cup finely chopped red onion
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
30 cherry tomatoes, halved (optional)

Dressing
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh oregano
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Preparation:
 
Bring a large saucepan three-fourths full of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the shrimp and simmer until pink, about 5 minutes. Drain the shrimp and rinse quickly under cold water.<P>
Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the garlic, lemon juice, and red pepper flakes. Add the hot shrimp to the garlic mixture and marinate for 10 minutes.

In a large bowl, toss together the shrimp with the marinade, the scallions, red onion, capers, celery, and tomatoes.

To make the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk together the oregano, olive oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice, and vinegar.

Pour over the shrimp and vegetables, add the parsley, and toss to incorporate. Cover and refrigerate until ready to eat. Serve chilled.

About this recipe:

"Most people think of capers, or kappari, as exclusively Italian, but I've always thought their flavor was perfect in Greek foods. The briny, piquant flavor makes me think of a sun-drenched hillside next to blue water, which for me means Skopelos. The Greeks have cooked with capers for millennia; historians note that Greeks brought capers to Gaul as early as 600 B.C.These days, if you stop in a Greek taverna, you'll often find large capers set out in small bowls as mezes, appetizers. Try these with a sip of ouzo-flavors don't get more intense than this.
In my kitchen I really like a final sprinkling of capers over roasted vegetables, especially red peppers, eggplant, and Brussels sprouts, and I'm a big fan of piccata sauce made with capers, lemon, fresh parsley, and butter. But I like capers best with seafood-both have the flavor of sun and sea-and I think combining shrimp and capers makes each one taste better.
One clove of garlic gives the shrimp a subtle flavor. If you like a heartier flavor, double the garlic in this recipe.
I serve this as a first course, as a quick, light dinner, or as a leisurely weekend brunch. Add cherry tomatoes when they're in season. Serve on a bed of young field greens if you like."


Cat Cora
 

Excerpts from: "Cat Cora's Kitchen", by Cat Cora


Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?

 
Watch Your Manners In Greece
Dress Code (Part II)

Continued from April's issue...

- Since Greece is a warm country, in the summer men usually avoid wearing socks. However, there are still some exceptions: we always wear socks when wearing shoes with laces, when on a formal business meeting or in specific official buildings such as ministries or the Parliament, when wearing a suit and tie.

- Our grandfathers' hats have been substituted, especially in the summer, by caps. Even for these, old etiquette rules apply - we always remove our hat when entering a room, when greeting a lady, or when introduced to someone. Men should avoid earrings, rings, chains and other items of jewelry
 (unless, of course, they happen to be Ricky Martin or Elton John look-alikes).

- Men's aftershave should be subtle enough not to attract either positive or negative comments when in a public area or in a social gathering. Slightly more is suitable for private moments.

- Since it is inappropriate for men to hoist up their trousers constantly by the belt, if we feel that our trousers are loose we should use braces. These should always be hidden underneath a jacket or waist coat. Braces and a belt should not be worn simultaneously.

- A gentleman should never hide his eyes. When meeting a lady he should always remove his sunglasses.

- The old rule stating that a man should shave daily is still valid. There was a time when beards and moustaches were most fashionable in Greece, however this trend no longer exists.

- There are only two occasions where a man can appear with a bare chest: if he is sleeping with his partner (he should wear pajamas when sleeping on his own) and at the beach.

- Jewelry offers both internal and external satisfaction it is a pleasure to the eye of the beholder and the wearer.

- Jewelry should be chosen according to the time of the day and the location. We should in general avoid expensive jewelry
 in. the morning, and should not wear handfuls of precious bijoux at night. A family ring on the little finger, or above the wedding ring, a bead necklace in the summer and a few casual items on an island or in the countryside (ie a watch or a chain) are an indication of discretion and good taste.

- Can we mingle real and fake jewelry? The conservatives' answer is a firm no, but Coco Channel's supporters encourage this coexistence. It is really up to us to choose which of the two we prefer, but if we choose to mingle fake and real, the result must be pleasant and matching. In general, we should avoid such combinations since the former is accepted as long as it is elegant and not a replica. When wearing real jewelry, we should ensure that there are no extreme differences in each item's worth.

- We shouldn't show off our expensive jewelry. We should wear them tactfully and discreetly. And of course, we shouldn't wear them at the beach, at sports events, health clubs, in the countryside or in bed.

- A bride shouldn't wear much jewelry. A simple cross necklace and earrings are ideal.

- During mourning it is not advisable to wear jewelry, except perhaps a discreet cross. Queen Victoria was the first to establish the wearing of a pearl necklace at funerals.

- A pearl necklace suits all clothes apart from tracksuit trousers and T-shirts.

- The only items we are allowed to wear at all times are our wedding and engagement rings.

- We shouldn't wear two different precious stones on the same hand, unless they are bound together on the same ring.

- Young girls shouldn't wear expensive jewelry, apart from a simple chain around the neck.

- Men's choice of jewelry and accessories is limited to watches, cufflinks, and wedding rings. The tie-pin is no longer in fashion. A gentleman may use a golden lighter, note-clip, gold or silver cigarette case and a key-ring.

- Men can also wear their baptismal cross. However, this should always be worn inside the shirt and should not be obvious.

to be continued...

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis
 

Technical Tips:

Unsolicited Email Filters and SPAM Reduction Techniques

Without a doubt unsolicited emails commonly referred to as SPAM are one of the major problems of all internet users. It is not uncommon to receive daily hundreds of email messages promoting various products and services without your request or participation in a relevant email list. The major problem of SPAM is your mailbox getting inundated with messages that you have to download, which costs money for the Internet resources used, and the time wasted sorting through potentially thousands of meaningless emails. Some people no longer consider email as a reliable communication medium and use it for casual discussions, while others abandoned using email all together.

To assist in the reduction of SPAM, several technologies are recommended and used. In this article we outline each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, and where you can find further information:

Email Filters: They come in many "flavors" each claiming to be more effective than others in determining SPAM without affecting legitimate emails.  The basic idea behind email filtering is to scan for words that typically appear in SPAM and mark those messages as SPAM. The most efficient type Baysean filtering uses statistical methods to determine which words (when appearing together) may constitute an unsolicited message. "Suspect" emails are placed in a "holding" area whereas "Positives" can be automatically deleted. Pros: They are "adjustable". In other words you can adjust how sensitive they are in determining legitimate emails versus SPAM. You can also "train" them using existing verified SPAM Cons: You still may need to take a look at the "Suspect" folders for legitimate messages that may have been misidentified as SPAM. It is common for  More resources and free software*: http://spambayes.sourceforge.net/

White Lists / Black Lists:  Using White-listing services users create a list of addresses from which they do want to receive messages (rather than force them to blacklist)
. Although very effective, the problem with White Lists is that you have to know everyone that could potentially send you an important message. Pros: Very effective in stopping emails from sources you do not approve. Cons:You do not know if that lost friend just came across your email and is trying to get in touch with you. More resources: This feature is usually implemented by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). For more information on how to access this feature please contact your ISP. For third party white-listing services you may contact MailFrontier, Vanquish, or CrueMail.

If you are using a White List or a similar type of email filtering system please note that Greekshops.com sends the majority of its emails using the addresses mailinglist@greekshops.com and support@greekshops.com  To receive customer service, discounts, special offers, and automated messages regarding your order, we kindly ask that you add these addresses to your "Trusted" senders.

Greekshops.com is pro-active in the reduction of unsolicited emails. Our emails are sent exclusively to members of our mailing list who elected to participate, and customers with pending orders. In addition, we do not share our mailing lists with marketing companies.



*Greekshops.com does not endorse or recommend any software. Install at your own risk.
 What's New!!!
 Greek Music & PAL Video - Latest Releases
H Paliria - Irini  Merkouri

H Paliria - Irini Merkouri
Yiannis Tassios - Anisiho gia sena 2 CD set

Yiannis Tassios - Anisiho gia sena 2 CD set
 
Eho Sta Matia Ourano - Keti Garbi

Eho Sta Matia Ourano - Keti Garbi
Eti Fotos...Best of Kostas Makedonas (2CD + PAL DVD)

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Vasilis Saleas LIVE AT Constantinople 2 CD Set - On Sale!

Vasilis Saleas LIVE AT Constantinople 2 CD Set - On Sale!
ZERO 4 by Antaeus : chill-out & dance beats features

ZERO 4 by Antaeus : chill-out & dance beats features 'olympic anthem' - Antaeus
Iparhi kai to Zeibekiko LIVE - 2 CD Set

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Mono Epitihies 2005 - Compilation

Mono Epitihies 2005 - Compilation
   
number one - Elena Paparizou DVD - (Zone 2/Pal)

Number one - Elena Paparizou DVD - (Zone 2/Pal)
Ta Horeftika Tou Noti - Notis Sfakianakis DVD (Zone 2 / PAL)

Ta Horeftika Tou Noti - Notis Sfakianakis DVD (Zone 2 / PAL)
Natassa Theodoridou The Video Collection - DVD (Pal & Zone 2)

Natassa Theodoridou The Video Collection - DVD (Pal & Zone 2)
EURO 2004 : Uefa Official National Team Game Collection 7 DVD Set - Zone 2

EURO 2004 : Uefa Official National Team Game Collection 7 DVD Set - Zone 2
Nifes (Brides) 2 DVD (PAL Zone 2)

Nifes (Brides) 2 DVD (PAL Zone 2)
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Culinaria Greece by Milona, Marianthi

Culinaria Greece by Milona, Marianthi
 
Cat Cora

Cat Cora's kitchen
Nosthimia! The Greek American Family Cookbook

Nosthimia! The Greek American Family Cookbook
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Pame Prova - Arkas

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Eksipno Pouli Hamhles Pthseis by Arkas

Eksipno Pouli Hamhles Pthseis by Arkas
Spourgiti Eisai & Fainesai Xamiles Ptiseis by Arkas

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Ellinikh Glossa - by G. Babiniotis

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Epishmo Anamnhstiko Programma - Official / Athens 2004 Official Program

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33 Roz Roumpinia - by E. Trivizas
 
88 Ntolmadakia - by E. Trivizas

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Decorative Magnets with Greek Landscapes
Greek Island Magnet 1 - Rhodes

Greek Island Magnet 1 - Rhodes
Greek Island Magnet 2 - Corfu

Greek Island Magnet 2 - Corfu
Greek Island Magnet 3 - Santorini

Greek Island Magnet 3 - Santorini
Greek Island Magnet 4 - Lefkada

Greek Island Magnet 4 - Lefkada
Santorini View Magnet Style 106

Santorini View Magnet Style 106
Naxos Magnet Style 378

Naxos Magnet Style 378
Santorini Balcony Magnet Style 43

Santorini Balcony Magnet Style 43
Santorini Coast Magnet Style 45

Santorini Coast Magnet Style 45
Santorini Church Magnet Style 47

Santorini Church Magnet Style 47
Chalkidiki Magnet Style 509

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Other new additions to our store

Cyprus Flag Standard 3 x 5 ft.

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Mini Cyprus Flag 4x6 in.

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Denim Greek Fisherman

Denim Greek
Fisherman's Hat
Leather Greek Fisherman

Leather Greek Fisherman's Hat - Brown
Leather Greek Fisherman

Leather Greek Fisherman's Hat - Black

  Featured Destination: Mistras


As you approach Mistras (5 krn from Sparta) you feel as though you're making a pilgrimage to Byzantine Greece. Going up the hill, you enter through the castle gate, which welcomes you to wander for a while, delighted, through the narrow lanes of this once invincible fortress.

The castle of Mistras was built by the Franks in 1249 in their attempt to establish their supremacy over the Peloponnese. Their catastrophic defeat at Pelagonia (1259) forced them to hand over Mistra to the Greeks. The Frankish prince Guillaume de Villehardouin erected the castle. He built bastions for his knights, houses, dungeons, storerooms, courtyards. From up here he ruled over the world of the Evrotas. As time went by, houses were built on the hillside under the Frankish castle, and a town was born whose fate was to become the centrer of civilisation and the cradle of the last dynasty of the Byzantine emperors.

The houses roundabout are of two or three storeys. With their imposing vaulted roofs and arcades these mansions lead up to the Palace, an architectural creation of the Palaioloques. The throne room, the chapel with its vestiges of Byzantine frescoes, the rooms lighted by large windows with ogival arches, are some of the features of this building whose construction took place in various periods, according to the style prevailing in Constantinople. During its two centuries of Mistras' existence as the Byzantine capital of the Peloponnese many churches and monasteries with domes and chapels were erected, representing all the painting trends of the capital.

The most important monument you meet on your way up - and the first to be built - is the Cathedral of Agios Dimitrios. On the floor of the church is the two-headed eagle, symbol of the Palaiologos dynasty, carved into a plaque. According to tradition, this is where Konstantinos stepped when he was crowned King. Next to it stands the carved throne.

In 1449, Konstantinos Palaiologos was crowned emperor of Byzantium and he left Mistras for Constantinople. In 1453 the Turks captured Constantinople, and a few years later, in 1460, the same fate befell Mistras. Mistras, the brilliant capital of the Despotate of the Morea, was reduced to an insignificant village.

The frescoes in the Cathedral show a shining sky painted by skilfull hands. One wing of the church houses the Museum. Towards the northern corner of the enclosure stand Mistras' two most impressive churches, Agii Theodori and the Panagia Odigitria, known as the Afentiko. Its wall paintings hold you spellbound. Near the highest gate of the castle stands the church of Agia Sofia, while on the slope to the east is the Pantanassa monastery, built by the lords of the 15th century. The church is impressive in its elegance and refinement. Its frescoes are filled with bright colour and movement. The Pantanassa today is a hospitable convent with clean cells looked after by gentle nuns, the only living beings in Mistras. Strolling through the narrow lanes of the dead city, you finally come to the Perivlepto, the monastery built under a rock with marvellous frescoes. It is from here that the ascent to the castle begins. Winding stairways, arcades, courtyards. Everything in ruins: crumbling facades, turrets with ravaged opening, damaged plaques, decayed mansions. At some point you reach the bare part of the mountain. Below you stretches the endless valley. In front of you a steep path leads to the top of the hill. In an impregnable position, its ramparts and fortification impose themselves on the landscape. The security this castle offered in the face of foreign and local enemies permitted its bishops, lords, enlightened clerics, founders of schools of philosophy, monks, artists, writers and other men of intellect, like Pachomius, Nikephoros Moschopoulos and Gemistos Plethon to transform this town, "protected by God", into a cradle of the Renaissance.

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Mystras

Mystras

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

The Peloponnese - Travel Guide

The Peloponnese - Travel Guide

Mycenae - Epidaurus

Mycenae - Epidaurus

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

 Saints' Namedays in May

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

 

 

 

 
 
 
1
Greek Orthodox Easter,
Anastasios, Anastasia
2
St. George
3
Timotheou
4
Pelagias
5
Eirinis
6
Serafim
7
Akakiou

8
 

9
Christoforou
 

10
Simonos
11
Kurillou & Methodou
12


 
13
Sergiou / Glykerias
14
 
15
Paxomiou
16
 
17
Andronikou
18
Ioulias
19
Menandriou
20

 
21
Kostantinou & Elenis
22
 
23 24 25 26 27
Ioannou Rosou
28
Tis Analipseos

 
29
Theodosias
30
Isaakiou
31  


 
     


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
Want to know more about Orthodox Saints?
Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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