March 2006 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: Smoking Special Feature : Food &Cooking Suggestions for Lenten
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Siphnos 
Saint Namedays in March March 's Recipe
Suggestions & Comments Subscription Information
March 's Recipe:
Taramosalata

 
 
Ingredients:
- 115g/4oz smoked mullet roe
- 2 garlic cloves, crushed
- 30ml/2tbsp grated onion
- 60ml/4tbsp grated olive oil
- 4 slices of white bread, crusts removed
- juices of 2 lemons
- 30ml/2tbsp milk or water
- freshly ground black pepper
- warm pita bread to serve
 
Preparation:
1. Place the smoked fish roe, garlic, grated onion, oil, bread and lemon juice in a blender or food processor and process until smooth.

2. Scrape down the edges of the food processor to ensure that all the ingredients are properly incorporated.  Blend quickly again.

3. Add the milk or water and process again for a few seconds.  (This will give the taramosalata a creamier texture.)

4. Pour the taramosalata into a serving bowl, cover with clear film (plastic wrap) and chill for 1-2 hours before serving.  Sprinkle the dip with black pepper and serve with warm pita bread.

 

Excerpts from: "The Food and Cooking of Greece"


Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?



 


 
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Watch Your Manners In Greece
Smoking


Continued from February 's Issue...

- A pleasurable source of enjoyment or just a foul habit? The dilemma remains. In the past, smokers had the law on their side; nowadays they face all sorts of accusations. Smoking in Greece is still a trend - Greeks are some of the most voracious smokers in the world - and although both defenders and accusers tend to have aggressive reactions, smokers and non-smokers can live in harmony provided they understand and respect each others' needs and desires.

- Since 1 / 1 /2003 the Greek government has ruled that smoking is forbidden in all indoor public areas (offices, public waiting rooms, meeting rooms, assemblies, etc), in all forms of public transport, in taxis, airplanes and at bus and railway stations, in lifts or on escalators, in all areas provided for health services (public hospitals, areas of communal or public sanitation areas, private clinics, military hospitals, health centers, blood-donation centers, diagnostic research labs) or in churches, cemeteries, theatres or cinemas.

- All restaurants, patisseries, cafes etc are required by law, as from 1 / 10/2002, to have special nonsmoking areas. Non-smokers must have at least 50% of the establishment's total space. The application of this decree is not necessary for nightclubs and bars, which only work at night, or at traditional Greek kafeneia (cafeterias).

- When seated at the dinner table, we should not light a cigarette as soon as we sit down. Smoking is usually allowed before or after dessert. We should not smoke when others are eating, but must wait patiently until they have finished. It is polite to ask our hostess's permission to smoke. However, smoking is such a widespread habit in our country, that usually it is sufficient merely to ask those nearby if our smoking would disturb them. If their answer is yes, we must wait until everyone has finished eating and has left the table; or we may go either to the veranda (if it is summer) or into another room so as not to disturb any non-smokers.

- It is most inappropriate to appear on a date, enter or exit a house or a restaurant or even dance while holding a cigarette.
- When introduced to someone older than us, we should immediately put out our cigarette. If we cannot bring ourselves to do this, we should at least refrain from puffing on the cigarette in their presence.

- If we have invited somebody to a restaurant, politeness suggests that we ask for a table in smoking area if our guest is a smoker, even if smoking bothers us. We ask for our guest's understanding, however, if we suffer from a serious health problem and cannot sit in a smoky atmosphere.

- We may smoke in our office if the company or our employer allows it. We must always, however, bear in mind that it leaves an unpleasant reek behind us.

- We should never empty our car's ashtray on the road (yes, this does happen in Greece - drivers tip out old stubs while waiting at traffic lights or while stuck in a traffic jam).

- Beware of ash! The carpets of a house should not be considered an endless ashtray. Nor have coffee cups been designed for this purpose.

- A gentleman should not await until a lady asks for light. He should use his perceptiveness and sense of good timing, and as soon as she removes a cigarette from her pack he should have a lighter ready.


Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Special Feature: Food & Cooking Suggestions for Lenten

                    

What Greeks eat is intrinsic to Greek culture. The close connection between culinary traditions and social or religious traditions is most evident during Lent and at Easter, periods when how foods are prepared and consumed are entwined with the observance of these religious celebrations. To the non-Orthodox, the veritable cornucopia that is the Lenten table and the tradition of kicking - off Lent with a feast of delicacies like shellfish, sesame halva, and glistening olives (not to mention the hours devoted to their preparation) doesn't seem to fit their notion of fasting as abstinence-whether from all food or front favorite foods. But these Lenten culinary traditions were not shaped solely by spiritual or religious notions, but are also rooted in dietary habits with other influences.

Lifestyle changes have relaxed Greeks' adherence to tradition, and the number of Greeks who strictly observe fasting periods throughout the year is shrinking, although most still refrain from eating meat (including fish with backbones) and animal products on Kathara Deftera (Clean Monday) and during Holy Week. And while many Lenten dishes are common throughout Greece, there are countless regional variations or specialties, many handed down from generation to generation.

"In Cretan tradition, food during Lent was spare," says Nikos Psilakis, author and vice president of the Greek Acade my of Taste. "The day's main meal was often wild greens-understandably, since March is greens' best season-or pulses cooked in one of several ways. Dinner was light, usually some type of what-based pasta. And, of course, bread was a staple during Lent, too."

Lagana is one of Lent's emblematic foods. This large, flat, yeastless bread is a modern-day version of the ancient artolagano, and consumed along with savory foods like tararnosalata as well as halva or other sweets with a sesame or tahini base. While halva is commonly made with sesame in most parts of Greece, in eastern Thrace, it's known locally as boulamas and made with flour and petimezi, a fruit syrup (usually made from grapes, but sometimes also from figs). Many Greek sweets like baklava are also adapted for Lent, with olive oil substituted for butter so aside from the phyllo-wrapped nutmeat sweets, the Lenten dessert table includes fried dough like diples, deep-fried loukoumades, or xerotigana-all served drizzled with honey, cinnamon, and sesame seeds.

"There are numerous culinary options for Lent," says chef Aryiro Barbarigou, owner of Papadakis Restaurant on Paros and author of Aegean Recipes. "On the islands, we usually eat a lot of octopus-stewed with orzo and tomato paste or barbecued, a great meze for tsipouro. Calamari and squid can also be cooked with spinach or local, wild greens-a very tasty dish. And of course vegetable or pulse stews, with an olive oil base, are also popular."

Overnight, Greek palates make the transition from Lenten to Easter flavors. After forty days of abstaining from meat and animal products, the digestive system needs to be eased into the heavier culinary pleasures of Easter foods. This task falls to mayiritsa, the steaming soup served after the Anastasi service, along with hard-boiled eggs (dyed a deep red on Good Thursday). "The basic dish is a lemony soup made with finely chopped pieces of lamb's liver, lettuce, dill, and spring onions," says Cretan chef Petros Kosmadakis, a collector of traditional recipes. "Of course, there are regional variations. In some parts of Greece, rice is added to the soup; in other, chopped lamb's intestines are stirred in just before the avgolemono is added. On Crete, it's the only food we serve after the Anastasi, along with boiled eggs and kaltsounia made with fresh anthotiro and mint."

Lamb (or goat on the islands) is the traditional Easter meat served throughout Greece, although how it's cooked varies from region to region. Spitroast lamb, which originated in Roumeli, is now the prevalent tradition, but many areas preserve their distinctive way of preparing the Easter dish. On many islands - including Andros, Samos, Naxos, and Rhodes - lamb is stuffed with rice and herbs then baked in the oven.

The Eater table is also laden with crsip lettuce salads flavored with dill and spring onions, special breads like lambrokouloures and tsoureki, and rich, fresh cheeses. On the mainland, these are served plain, while on my islands, these creamy cheeses are served in baked goods like kaltsounia. On Crete, cheese and meat are combined in a single, brilliant dish: kreatotourta (meat cake), a pie made with sweet and sour mizithra cheese, lamb's meat, mint, and cinnamon.


                                                                                                                                                                Excerpts from: ODYSSEY magazine
 
The Lenten Collection A Cookbook

The Lenten Collection A Cookbook
The Greek Vegetarian  by Diane Kochilas - Softcover

The Greek Vegetarian by Diane Kochilas - Softcover
 
Palirria Traditional Greek Bean Soup

Palirria Traditional Greek Bean Soup
Stuffed Peppers and Tomatoes with Rice

Stuffed Peppers
and Tomatoes with Rice
Spinach with Rice

Spinach with Rice
Greek Macedonian Halva with Honey

Greek Macedonian Halva with Honey
Greek Dessert Makedonikos Halva Pistachio

Greek Dessert
Makedonikos Halva
Pistachio
Greek Dessert Makedonikos Halva  Cocoa

Greek Dessert
Makedonikos Halva
Cocoa
Greek Dessert Makedonikos Halva With Almonds

Greek Dessert
Makedonikos Halva
With Almonds
Moustokouloura Papadopoulos Grape and Raisin cookies

Moustokouloura Papadopoulos Grape and Raisin cookies
 What's New!!!
 Music & DVDs
Melina Aslanidou, Pehnidi Ine

Melina Aslanidou, Pehnidi Ine
Erimia - Theodorakis, Farandouri, Mitsias

Erimia - Theodorakis, Farandouri, Mitsias
Victoria Halkiti, Telia f***ing edition

Victoria Halkiti, Telia f***ing edition
Astoria DVD (NTSC)

Astoria DVD (NTSC)
 
Olympiakos DVD Collection 7+1 (PAL)

Olympiakos DVD Collection 7+1 (PAL)
The Cherry Orchard DVD (NTSC)

The Cherry Orchard DVD (NTSC)
The Trojan Women DVD (NTSC)

The Trojan Women DVD (NTSC)
Htipokardia Sto Thranio DVD (NTSC)

Htipokardia Sto Thranio DVD (NTSC)
Doulies Tou Podariou DVD (NTSC)

Doulies Tou Podariou DVD (NTSC)
H Koomissa Tis Kerkiras DVD (NTSC)

H Koomissa Tis Kerkiras DVD (NTSC)
H Daskala Me Ta Xantha Malia DVD (NTSC)

H Daskala Me Ta Xantha Malia DVD (NTSC)
 
H Thia Apo To Chicago DVD (NTSC)

H Thia Apo To Chicago DVD (NTSC)
Pare Kosme DVD (PAL)

Pare Kosme DVD (PAL)
Andres Xeroun N

Andres Xeroun N'Agapoun DVD (PAL)
 
 Books & Software
Illustrated Sports Encyclopedia , In Greek

Illustrated Sports Encyclopedia , In Greek
Six Language Visual Dictionary

Six Language Visual Dictionary
Illustrated Junior Sports Encyclopedia, In Greek

Illustrated Junior Sports Encyclopedia, In Greek
Athens Scenes from a Capital City by John Cleave

Athens Scenes from a Capital City by John Cleave
 
Xenophon

Xenophon's Cyrus the Great : The Arts of Leadership and War, edited by Larry Hedrick
The Peloponnesian War : Athens, Sparta, and the Struggle for Greece by Sir Nigel Bagnall

The Peloponnesian War : Athens, Sparta, and the Struggle for Greece by Sir Nigel Bagnall
Songs on Bronze : The Greek Myths Made Real, by Nigel Spivey

Songs on Bronze : The Greek Myths Made Real, by Nigel Spivey
Low-Fat Lies High-Fat Frauds and the healthiest diet in the world by Vigilante and Flynn

Low-Fat Lies High-Fat Frauds and the healthiest diet in the world by Vigilante and Flynn
A to Z Greece by Byron Augustin and Rebecca A. Augustin

A to Z Greece by Byron Augustin and Rebecca A. Augustin, in English
 
Greece! Rome! Monsters! by John Harris

Greece! Rome! Monsters! by John Harris, in English
Lose Weight on the Mediterranean Diet, by Elisabeth Havlicek-Kastanaki

Lose Weight on the Mediterranean Diet, by Elisabeth Havlicek-Kastanaki
 
Elliniko Gevma & Pardiko Party Set by Nikos Tselementes

Elliniko Gevma & Pardiko Party by Nikos Tselementes
Systran Gold ver.5.0,  English   Greek Translation Software

Systran Gold ver.5.0, English <-> Greek Translation Software
   
 Vigil Oil Candles
Brass Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili ) style 5305

Brass Vigil Oil Candle
( Kandili ) style 5305
Brass Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili ) style 5307

Brass Vigil Oil Candle
 ( Kandili ) style 5307
Brass Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili ) style 5194

Brass Vigil Oil Candle
( Kandili ) style 5194
Gold Metallic Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili )

Gold Metallic Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili )
Silver Metallic Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili )

Silver Metallic Vigil Oil Candle ( Kandili )

 
 New Additions!
Torino 2006 USA Medal Count Pin Set

Torino 2006 USA Medal Count Pin Set
 
Torino 2006 Women

Torino 2006 Women's Figure Skaing Pin Set
Palirria Traditional Greek Bean Soup

Palirria Traditional Greek Bean Soup
Swarovski Rhinestone Gray Yoga Pants (logo on front)

Swarovski Rhinestone Gray Yoga Pants (logo on front)
Koukla Cotton/Spandex Yoga Pants (logo on backside)

Koukla Cotton/Spandex Yoga Pants (logo on backside)
 Traditional Greek Costumes



 

The Traditional costumes of Tsolia and Amalia are here and on time for the National Greek Holiday of March 25th! Handmade in Greece, these high quality costumes include vest, fez (hat), skirt, tufts, and stockings for boys, and skirt, vest, and fez for girls. Available in a variety of sizes for children ages
1 to 14.

Please allow 2-3 weeks for delivery.

For more information,[click here]
 

  Featured Destination: Siphnos



GEOGRAPHY.
The fourth isle of the Western Cyclades lies between Seriphos, Kimolos and Antiparos. Seriphos is 74 sq. km. in area, has 70 km. of coastline and is 76 nautical miles from Piraeus. There is a car and passenger ferry from Piraeus every day, as well as connections with Seriphos, Kimolos and Melos, while during the summer there is a local service with Paros. The island's capital is Apollonia and its population is 2,027. A mountainous island (highest peak Profitis Ilias, 680 m. a.s.l.) intersected by small, fertile plains in the bays and along the coast. It also has considerable mineral wealth (schistose rocks, marble, granite and limestone). With its shining white houses, countless churches and lovely landscape, Siphnos is ideal for those seeking a quiet, island atmosphere, as well as for those wishing to combine relaxation with sophistication and company. The island is quite well equipped to cater for tourists and there are regular communications.


HISTORY.
In ancient times Siphnos was extremely wealthy on account of its gold, copper and silver mines. It was first inhabited by Karians and Phoenicians who called it Akys or Meropia. Later it was called Minoa by the Minoans who settled there. In historical times it was colonised by Ionians and experienced a splendid floruit, as exemplified by the Siphnian Treasury, votive to the god Apollo in his sanctuary at Delphi. Prehistoric remains have been located at Kalamitsi, Aghios Andreas and Aghios Nikitas. Siphnos took part in the Persian Wars and afterwards joined the Athenian League. In Hellenistic and Roman times it followed the same fate as the other Cyclades and in the Byzantine period belonged to the Thema of the Aegean. Between 1207 and 1269 it was subject to the Venetian Duchy of Naxos. It was pillaged by Barbarossa in 1537 but only capitulated to the Turks in 1617, until which date the Gozzadini overlords managed to maintain their dominance. Siphnos played an active role in the 1821 Revolution and was liberated at the same time as the rest of the Cyclades.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS. Apollonia, the island's capital, is built in its hinterland, spreading amphitheatrically over three hills. Its narrow streets with whitewashed paving stones are flanked by two-storeyed, brilliant white Cycladic houses, mansions of old families and churches (Virgin Ouranophora, Saviour, St. Sozon). North of Apollonia is the private convent of the Theologian tou Moungou. In town there is a folklore collection. 1.5 km. northeast, at a higher level, is picturesque Artemonas with its windmills on the crest of the hill and a stunning view. North of Artemonas is the Hellenistic tower of Kastanas. A pathway leads from Artemonas, through the olive groves and vineyards, to Kastro (there is also a metalled road from Apollonia, which is less picturesque). Kastro, built on a sheer cliff on the east side of the island overlooking the sea, has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Excavations have brought to light some finds from the Early Bronze Age, but mainly of the Geometric, Archaic and Classical eras. This was the island's capital until 1836 when it was transferred to Apollonia. Traces of the ancient acropolis on the northwest slope of the hill have been revealed in excavations conducted by the British School of Archaeology, as well as the foundations of houses dating to the 8th and 7th century BC. The castle we see today was thus arranged in the 14th century and is architecturally similar to those on Kimolos, Antiparos, Sikinos and Pholegandros, where the houses are built one joined to the other, forming the external enceinte, and parallel with these is a second, internal row of houses. Several of the many churches within the castle have survived (St. Eleousa, Dormition, St. Catherine, St. Demetrius, Forty Saints). Housed in the old Catholic church of St. Anthony of Padua is a small archaeological collection. At Seralia, southeast of Kastro, remains of the medieval harbour installations are preserved.

A short distance to the southeast of Apollonia are the villages of Exambela (2 km.), birthplace of the poet Aristomenis Provelengios (further south is the 16th century Vrysi monastery), Kato Petali, (with the nearby monastery of Chrysostom, built in 1550) and Katavati (3 km.). A path leads from here to the hill of Aghios Andreas, on which stands a church of that name, built in 1890. Prehistoric finds discovered in this region confirm its continuous habitation from Mycenaean till Hellenistic times. There are quaint little villages at Platys Yalos (10 km. south of Chora) and at Vathy (where there are also potters' workshops). Northeast of Platys Yalos is a ruined Hellenistic tower and, on an eminence above, the monastery of the Virgin of the Mountain. On a spit in the gulf of Faros stands the 17th century monastery of the Virgin Chrysopigi, protectress of the island. The monastery of the Taxiarchs is situated above Vathy and that of Prophet Elijah in the island's interior is the most important Byzantine monument on Siphnos, dating back to the 8th century, according to tradition, and with a 12th century marble iconostasis in its katholikon.

At Kamares, the island's port, there are potters' workshops. From here one can take a boat trip to the bays of Vathy, Platys Yalos and Faros with their shallow, sparkling waters and sandy shores. There are other beaches suitable for swimming at Kamares, Chrysopigi, Seralia below Kastro and Chersonisos, which is a long way off and can be reached by caique. There is a refuelling station for boats at Kamares. Accommodation is available in hotels, of which there are several, pensions and rented rooms.
 

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Going to Live and Work in Greece

Going to Live and Work in Greece
2005 edition

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece - A Guide to the Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Greece - A Guide to the
Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Cruise Greece DVD

Cruise Greece DVD

 Saints' Namedays in March

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
    1
Eudokias / Tis Tyrofagou/ Marias Aigyptias

 
2
Euthalias
3
Kleonikou
4 5
Kononos
6
 
7
Laurentiou
8
Theofulaktouu
9
 
10
 
11
 

12
 

13
 

14
 
15
 
16
Xristodoulou
17
Alexiou

 
18
Kurillou
19
Xrysanthou
20 21
Iakovou
22 23
 
24
 
 
25
Euagelismos tis Theotokou
26
 
 
27
Ilarionos
28


 

29
 

 
30 31
Ypatiou



 
 


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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