Greekshops.com Your Internet Shopping Connection to Greece
 July 2007 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: Continuations of the Aghion Oros (Mount Athos) and "The End" Special Feature : Kleftiko
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Lemnos 
Saint Namedays in June June's Recipe
Suggestions & Comments Subscription Information
July's Recipe:
"Seftalia"


 

Grilled ground meat rolls
 
Ingredients:

- 1 lb/500 g caul
- 2 lb/ 1kg of ground beef and pork, mixed
- 3 onions, finely diced
- Half bunch parsley, finely chopped
- 1 tsp dried or 2 tbsp fresh mint
- 3 tbsp breadcrumbs
- Half tsp cinnamon
- Salt
- Freshly ground black pepper
 
Preparation:

Soften the caul in a bowl of warm water. Season the other ingredients with salt and pepper and knead well. Carefully open out the caul on a flat work surface and trim off any thick parts. Cut into 4x4 inch (10x10 cm) squares and place some ground meat mixture at one edge of each square, fold the end and sides over the meat, then roll up firmly. Thread the sausages onto two flat skewers or a double spit and cook over a hot charcoal fire for 15 to 20 minutes, turning the skewers every 2-3 minutes. The meat will be moist and the outside golden brown.
 
 
Excerpts from: "Culinaria Greece" by Marianthi Milona

Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?




 

Important announcement on price and postage increases:


In the last few months we have experienced a significant increase in Euro to US dollar rates (over 10%) as well as increases in postal rates due to fuel costs (up 15%). The US Postal Service has also increased rates and modified its services effective May 15, 2007. UPS and FEDEX are also constantly adjusting their rates to match fuel increases. In the past we have tried to absorb the excess costs by reducing our margins but unfortunately the excessive increases have now forced us to adjust pricing to meet the mentioned increases in order to continue offering imported goods from Greece. We appreciate your understanding and are committed to reduce pricing as currencies and fuel costs decrease in the future. In the meantime we recommend bundling your orders to minimize the number of shipments and thus saving at least on shipping costs. Do note that ordering 2-3 items at a time is more cost effective than ordering and shipping the same items in separate shipments. For international shipments we now also offer a more reasonable Airmail option.

From time to time we are also going to be running promotions on overstocked items, or items received at reduced pricing from our manufacturers. Look in your email for these offers and do not forget to check our Clearance and "Special of the month" sections for instant savings.

For questions and tips in reference to shipping please consult our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section or email us at support@greekshops.com
 

Watch Your Manners In Greece
At the Aghion Oros (Mount Athos) Part 2 & "The End"

One more book on the Apostle Paul? Haven't scholars, historians and theologians  written enough about the life, the travels, and the theology of this man? Certainly, a great deal has been published about him if one considers only the 84 books on St. Paul listed in the Subject Guide to Books in Print 1970, or the 2987 articles entered in the Index to Periodical Literature on the Apostle Paul. By far the majority of these books and articles on St. Paul, however, are unavailable to the tourist interested in retracing the steps of the Apostle Paul in Greece unless he is determined to research in the famous Gennadion Library on the southern slopes of Lycabettus in Athens. Otherwise the inquisitive visitor will find it virtually impossible to obtain much information about the Apostle's ministry in Greece. While serving as pastor of St. Andrew's American Church in Athens during the past few years, I have seen many visitors go out of their way for guidance and information about the actual places associated with the spread of Gospel in Greece. The following pages are written in response to this interest, in the hope that they will help the historically oriented and religiously motivated tourist find his of her visit to some of the ancient biblical sites a more meaningful encounter with the past. At the very outset of these pages we want to acknowledge the widespread and popular dispute about the relationship of the message of Jesus to that of S. Paul.  Neither the person nor the message of the Apostle need any apology, but there are many sincere Christians who hesitate to get too deeply involved with the life and writing of the missionary Apostle. Endorsing the 19th century slogan of liberal Protestantism, "Back to Jesus," many Christians feel that they can rely exclusively  on the sayings and the portrait of the "historical Jesus" as the norm for their Christian life and, therefore, react negatively to the "religion about Jesus" as spelled out by St. Paul. Others accuse him for having perverted the simplicity of Jesus' message b unnecessarily shrouding it in theological and Christological concepts. No matter where we turn, there are many people who say "no" to St. Paul while at the same time affirming a strong "yes" for Jesus. The debate about the great missionary and theologian of the early Church and his message is, of course, as old as the Christian Church.  Even during his lifetime his opponents regarded him as an illegitimate apostle and an adulterator of the Christian Gospel, and the fathers of the early Church were inconsistent in their judgment.  The author of Pseudo-Clement, for example, compared him with Simon Magnus, the heresiarch par excellence, while others gave him the highest consideration and quoted his letters at length in their own writings. Whether or not the Apostle was familiar with the message preached by Jesus is a question to which historians and theologians  have given different answers, although it is certain that none of the Gospels in the form as they appear in the New Testament were known to him. St. Paul stressed a different aspect. Jesus proclaimed the messages of the Fatherhood and the Kingdom of God. The apostle emphasized the Cross and the Resurrection of Jesus as the Christ.
Whatever the differences, St. Paul's travels and ministry are tremendously meaningful, especially because of the intensely situational character of his preaching. If anyone ever looked at the world realistically, it was the Apostle Paul; if anyone ever recognized the need for revolutionary faith and ethic, again, it was the Apostle Paul. As are a few Christians in the 20th century, he was able to relate the liberation power of the Gospel to concrete situations, and this is especially evident in his writings to the churches in Greece. St. Paul wrote in response to immediate problems in the lives of people he knew, and he could never have dreamed that his explicitly situational correspondence would ever be collected and then accepted as a norm for Christian theology and ethics. As a messenger of the power of God unto salvation, St. Paul ought to be regarded as a prototype rather than as an example to be followed blindly. He served as mouthpiece of the very God who revealed himself in Jesus as the Christ, and as such the Apostle's message is invaluable to our understanding of the Christian Gospel. That there are contradictions or various degrees of emphasis in his statements should only enhance him to us for, though always conscious of his divine mission, he remained a man of flesh and blood. He was a theologian, not a systematician, and to press his statements into a preconceived dogmatic mold is methodologically illegitimate and robs him and his writings of their liberating power.

As for the source material, we are in the fortunate position of knowing more about St. Paul than about any other person of the early Church. Our knowledge about most of the Holy Apostles is very limited, and many of the legends and traditions related about them developed long after they lived. Even with respect to the person of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the central theme of the Apostle's message to the churches in Greece, the historian is in a much more difficult situation, for whatever we know about Jesus must be seen and evaluated through the eyes of the fellowship of believers. The gospel narratives, therefore, are statements of confessions of faith of the post-resurrection Church rather than biographical descriptions of what has been called the "historical Jesus." We posses no evidence, for instance, that Our Lord ever wrote a letter, not to mention a book. In contrast, St. Paul's personality and a great deal of other information pertaining to the personality and a great deal of other information pertaining to the Apostle's life are reflected in the New Testament epistular literature, of which thirteen documents claim his authorship.

This brief preface is not the place to discuss the thorny and certainly still undecided issues with respect to the authenticity of the various letters that carry the name of the Apostle. At the same time, we must recognize that the majority of these letters are invaluable for any kind of reconstruction of the Apostle's ministry. The letters, especially those addressed to the churches in Greece ( the letters to the Thessalonians, Corinthians, and Philippians), are primary sources for our study. These letters, addressed to his newly founded communities on the European mainland, were unquestionably written by St. Paul. Furthermore, in evaluating this material it is important for us to remember that, for example, the first Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians constitutes the very beginning of Christian literature. It was written about the middle of the first century, only twenty years after the death and resurrection of Our Lord. For that matter, all the letters with which we are concerned in this particular essay date to the fifties of this century. They were written at least a decade before the writing of the oldest Gospel, the Gospel of St. Mark.

The second New Testament source relevant to our study is the Acts of the Apostles, in which St. Luke sketched the beginnings of  Christianity, especially Christianity in Greece. The narrative begins with a description of the Jerusalem Church and culminates in Rome, where the Christian faith, mysteriously, ha already been established. More than half of this book centers around missionary activities of the Apostle Paul. Many scholars have considered the Acts as their principal source for their understanding of the Apostle's ministry. This is unfortunate because thee Acts of the Apostle's ministry. This is unfortunate because the Acts of the Apostles was written at a much later time, when the Christian Church was fairly well established in the eastern Mediterranean world. it is a pity that St. Luke was unacquainted with the Pauline letters, since they would, of course, have been of great value to him when writing about the life and work of St. Paul. St. Luke, furthermore, did not merely repeat what he had heard or read from the several sources at his disposal, but used his material to instruct his readers. He portrayed St. Paul not only as having died, but as already having become a hallowed memory. In the Acts, St. Paul is no longer a man grappling with difficulties as he is in his letters; he has become a heroic figure towering above priests, officers, governors, and kings.

A comparison of the image which St. Paul portrays of himself in his own writings with that presented to us almost fifty years later in the Acts of the Apostles reveals differences which force us to rely on St. Paul's own letters rather than categorically follow the Lukan version of the Acts. A list of the numerious discrepancies between these two sources can be found easily in any reputable study of the Apostle. In case of conflicting statements, we give preference to the personal testimony of the Apostle. Despite it's limitations, the narrative of the Acts of the Apostles gives us a welcome guideline to the itinerary of the Apostle's travels in Greece. All quotations from the Holy Scriptures are from Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyrighted in 1946 and 1952 by the Divison of Christ in the U.S.A., and are used by permission. For many helpful and invaluable suggestions, I should like to thank my colleagues of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and, finally, I must express my sincere gratitude to my secretary, Mrs. Sophia Hanazoglu, for preparing the manuscript for the press.


 

Special Feature:



 

What goat cheese is to the Greeks, khaloumi is to the Cypriots. This seductive cheese is not entirely a Cypriot invention, however, but is actually Arabic in origin. It is made from a mixture of sheep's, goat's, and cows milk, sometimes from 1000 percent sheep's or goat's milk, and the end product is the result of a complicated series of steps. First, the milk is heated slowly in a large cauldron over a very low heat. Then, the obligatory rennet is added, a kind of ready-made yeast, which comes from the mucous membrane found in the stomach of young kids and contains the important enzyme of chymosin. It helps young animals to digest their mothers' milk, but is used in cheese-making to coaglate the milk. The milk must the nbe left to rest until all the whey is removed and only the solids remain. Next, the cheese is dvided into portions and placed in special molds. The leftover whey is heated once more, the cheese portions are cut in two down ithe middle and carefully put back into the warm whey. A soon as they whey begins to buil, the lumps of cheese are scooped out again and laid on a wooden board. Once the khaloumi has cooled down, the process is repeated. The process is not complete until the cheese begins to float on the surface of the whey. The entire pan of whey is removed from the heat and left to cool for 5 minutes. The next step is to set out large plates containing salt and fresh mint leleaves, then toss eaach kaloumi cheese first in salt, then in the mint. This gives the cheese an unexpected flavor. A second cheese is then placed on top of the first, creating a sort of khaloumi sandwich. This stack of cheese is then stored in jars or clay pots filled with brine until the cheese are completely covered. Khaloummi contains 43% fat, a maximum 45% liquid, 22% protein and 2-3% salt. Four ounces (100grams) contains 300kcal. If you want the cheese to keep longer, it has to be left completely covered in a cintainer for at least 40 days. During this time, it is apparently unpalatable and is said to be "playing hooky." This process hardens the cheese to some extent that it can, with care, be grated over pasta dishes or baked. Khaloumi cheese can be stored for up to three months 35-39 F (2-4 C) and for over a year at -0.4 F (-18C). Once defrosted, it should be left to stand at room temperature for half an hour before being used. One of the special features of kaloumi is the fact  that it does not melt. It can, therefore, be fried, boiled, or broiled. IT is ideal as an appetizer, main course, or as a dessert course accompanied by fruits. Khaloumi always tastes surprisingly fresh.

Excerpts from: "Culinaria Greece" by Marianthi Minola
 

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  Featured Destination: Lemnos


GEOGRAPHY:  Southwest of Samothrace lies Lemnos, one of the loveliest isles of the Aegean. 475sq. km. in area, 259km. of coastline, 15721 inhabitants. There are car and passenger ferries from Piraeus, Kavala, Kymi Euboia, Ahios Konstantinos, as well as a link with Lesbos and, via the route Kavala - Pireaeus, with the islands of the east Aegean, the Dodecanese, Cyclades and Crete. A regular local service operates between Lemnos and Aghios Efstrations. There is a daily flight from Athens, Thessaloniki and Mytilene. Lemnos has a gentle landsape, wide tracts of flat land (highest point Skopia, 470 m. a.s.l.), clear sea and beautiful beaches. Even though hoards of tourists descend on it, it has lost none of its distinctive charm.

HISTORY. According to Homer the island was first settled by Sindians of Thracian provenance. Hephaistos was worshipped here. Indeed, the island's largest city was called Hephaisteia. In antiquity the island was known as Aithalia and played an important role at all ties due to its strategic position (25 miles from the Dardanelle straits). Excavations conducted by the Italian Archaeological School have shown that Lemnos has been inhabited since Neolithic times. During the Bronze Age a splendid civiilisation developed here (Poliochni), closely affined to that of Troy, finds from which are exhibited in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens and in the local museum at Myrina. In the 5th century BC Lemnos was laid waste by the Athenian general Miliades, then subjugated by the Persians. In 478 BC it joined the Athenian League. Its land was apportioned among Athenian lot holders who dedicated the famous bronze statue of Athenia Lemnia, work of Pheidias, on the Acropolis. Lemnos  remained dependent on Athens throughout antiquity except for brief intervals when it belonged to the Macedonians (307-202BC0 and the Romans (202-166 BC). In the Byzantine era it was included in the Thema of the Aegean and was a fief of a Venetian family until 1269, when it was expelled by the emperor Michael Palaeologus. In the ensuing centuries the island was a bone of contention between the Venetians and the Turks: the latter eventually captured it and held it until 1912 when it was liberated and incorporated into the Greek state.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS. Myrina (Kastro), the island's main town and harbour, is a mixture of old and new buildings. It has retained its ancient name, taken from one of the Amazons. Very little has remained of its ancient city, one of the largest on the island: traces of the fortification wall, houses and streets are nowadays discernible. A large number of clay figurines have been recovered in excavations and from their inscriptions it is deduced that a sanctuary of Artemis existed here. From Myrina one can visit other villages on the island both inland and coastal. At Kornos (7.5km northeast of Myrina) there are churches of the Dormition of the Virgin and St. Andrew. In the region of Kotsinas (3km. northeast) are ruins of a Venetian castle and, just beyond, are the ancient sites of Hephaisteia and Kabeirio. Hephaisteia (nowadays Palaiopoli), inhabited since prehistoric times, was one of the island's most important cities in the 5th century BC, when it was captured by Miltiades and subsequently made a member of the Athenian League. Excavations have brought to light houses, a sanctuary (destroyed in the 6th century BC), an extensive cemetery (8th-6th century BC) and a theatre of the Roman period. The rich finds (figurines, weapons, pottery) bear witness to the city's floruit and its contacts with Attica, Corinth and Macedonia. Athena was worshipped in this region and there was a sanctuary in her honour at Kome, to the north of Hephaisteia. At Chloi, 3km. north of Hephaisteia, is the sanctuary of the Cabeiroi, discovered in 1937. This santuary is older than that on Samothrace and a large stoa, Telesterion and countless inscriptions, furnishing a wealth of information concerning the sanctuary and important cities on the island, have been revealed. Near the village of Kaminia (35 km. east of Myrina), in the bay of Vroskopoos, the prehistoric city of Poliochni has been uncovered, which achieved its acme between 2700-2200 BC and continued to be occupied until around 1600 BC. Finds from here (mainly pottery and jewellery) comprise not only evidence of the cultural apogee but also of the close links maintained with Troy. Four successive well-stratified phases of occupation have been revealed, including foundations of large houses, walls and public buildings, the most splendid examples of which date to the fourth phase.

The island's picturesque villages, Moudros, Kontopuli, Livadochori, can be visited by car, as can the lovely beaches in the vicinity of Myrina and at Platys, Thanos, Skandali, Kaminia, all of which are accessible by caique and are ideal for fishing and swimming. For those with a boat there are any number of delightful little bays awaiting discovery. Refuelling stations at Myrina and Moudros. The only hotels of Lemnos are at Myrina but there are rooms and apartments for rent both there and else-where (Kontias, Moudros).
 

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Greek Island Hopping 2007 - Travel Guide

Greek Island Hopping 2007 - Travel Guide

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2005 edition

 

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Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean

Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean

 Saints' Namedays in August

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday


 




-

 
1


-Procession of the Cross
- Seven Maccabees, Eleazar
2


- Relics of Stephen the protomartyr
- Theodore of Daranelles
3


- Isaacius, Dalmatus, & Faustus, Salome the myrrhbeaarer
4


-Seven Holy Youth of ephesus

 
5
10th Sunday of Matthew

-Forefeast of the Transfiguration
-Eusygnius the Martyr of Antioch

6


-Transfiguration of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ

 

7

- Dometios of Persia & 2 Disciples
-Nikanor the Wonderworker
8


-Emilian, Bishop of Cyzikos
- Myronus the Wonderworker
9


-
Matthias, Apostle of the 70

10


-Laurence, Archdeacon of Rome
- Chitus of Athens, Bishop of Rome

11


- Euplus, Archdeacon of Cantania
-Niphonus, Pat. of Constan.

 

12
11th Sunday of Matthew

- Photios & Aniketos of Nicomedea
- 12 Soldier-martyrs of Crete

13


- Apodosis of the - Transfiguration
- Maximos the Confessor
14

- Forefeast of the Dormition
- Micah the Prophet

15

- The Dormition of our Most Holy -Lady the Theotokos

16

- Translation of the Image of Christ
-Diomedes of Tarsus
17

- Myron of Cyzicus
-Straton, Philip, Eutychian & Cyprian
18

- Floros & Lauros of Illyria
- John & George, Pat. of Constan.
19
12th Sunday of Matthew

- Andrew & his 2593 soldiers
- Timothy, Agapius and Thecla

20


- Samuel the Prophet
- Luke the Counselor
21

- Thaddeus of the 70
-Bassa & her sons

22

- Agathonikos & his Companions
- Martyr Anthuse

23

- Apodosis of the Dormition
- Ireneaus, Bishop of Lyons

24

- Eutyches the Hieromartyr
- Kosmas of Aetolia

25


- Return of body of Bartholomew
- Titus of the 70
26
13th Sunday of Matthew

- Adrian, Natalia & 33 Companions
- Righteous Joseph

27


- Poimen the Great
-Phanourios the Great Martyr

28


- Moses the Black of Scete
- Diomedes & Laurence the Martyrs

29


- Beheading of the forerunner
- Theodora of Thessaloniki
30

- Alexander, john & Paul, New Patriarhcs of Constantinople
31

-Honorable Sash of Theotokos
- Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage
 


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, special occasion greeting cards, and our exclusive Greek name customized mugs

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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