July 2006 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: At the Beach Special Feature : Pasteli
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Paros-Antiparos 
Saint Namedays in July July 's Recipe : Scallops with Garlic Crisps and Creamy Arugula
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July's Recipe:
Scallops with Garlic Crisps and Creamy Arugula


  
 
Ingredients:
- 2 cups arugula leaves
- 1 cup fresh mint leaves
- 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
- 1/4 cup heavy cream
- 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
- Salt and freshly milled pepper
- 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
- 1 1/2 pounds large sea scallops
- Grated Zest of 1 lemon

Preparation:
1. Reserve 1 arugula leaf for garnish.  Puree the remaining arugula, the mint, and 3 tablespoons of the oil in a blender until smooth.  Add the cheese and blend.  Simmer the cream in a small saucepan over medium heat until it begins to boil.  With the blender running, drizzle the cream into the arugula puree in a slow stream until well combine.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Cover to keep warm while you cook the scallops.

2. In a large nonstick skillet, warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat.  Add the garlic and fry until just golden.  Transfer the garlic crisps to a paper towel to drain.  Raise the heat to high.  Season the scallops with salt and pepper, and saute, turning once, until golden, 1 to 2 minutes per side.

3. Slice the reserved arugula leaf into thin ribbons.  To serve, pour the arugula puree on 4 serving plates and top with the scallops.  Garnish with the garlic crisps, arugula ribbons and lemon zest.

 
Excerpts from: "The Philosopher's Kitchen" by Francine Segan
 
Watch Your Manners In Greece
At the Beach

- Since the beach is a place where many people are gathered together, rules of good manners must necessarily be followed, primarily those concerning respect towards others.

- Public or remote beaches are the location for many meetings and are often the place where love stories begin.

- Swimsuits should be chosen according to our body size. Well-formed ladies should avoid gstrings and stout men should steer clear of Speedo's. At the beach, more than in any other place, a simple rule applies: "I look after myself, because I respect the people around me."

- After a certain age, ladies should wear one-piece swimming costumes. The age at which she ought to graduate into a one-piece depends on the condition and type of her body.

- It is inelegant for a lady to be playing beach volleyball topless. Although topless appearances may be appealing and a delightful view for some, it should only be done where and when appropriate.

- Mobile phone ring tones and sunbathers gossiping loudly on the beach are the last things one wishes to listen to after a tiring and stressful winter.

- We should adopt an appropriate body posture when lying on our towel. For example, women should not keep their legs wide open, and men should avoid scratching certain body parts.

- After enduring them on beaches for so many years, one starts to wonder wistfully whether the phenomenon of Greek mothers screaming and running around after their children will ever become extinct.

- Parents should teach their children how to behave appropriately at the beach. We should not scold other people's children or criticize their parents.

- Sun increases eroticism, but this is no excuse for voluptuous embraces in a common view. Private liaisons should be kept private.

- "Kamaki" is a Greek word for a common disease that seems to affect many men at the beach. It means "flirting." Some women enjoy it and others hate it. If a woman does not wish to respond to somebody's conversation, it is wise to halt it immediately, not after a tenth tequila shot at the beach bar.

- A gentleman should not be over-persistent or a burden; however, this does not mean that he is not allowed to persist at all, especially if he has been receiving some encouragement from the lady in question.

- Critical remarks towards other sunbathers such as "Oh dear, look at her cellulite," unless done very discreetly, are rude.

- It is a fact that ladies have in the past pretended to be drowning in order to meet the good-looking lifeguard.

- Sun over-exposure can seriously harm the skin. We should treat our skin with good care - apply sun block frequently, drink plenty of water and take plenty of cooling dips in the sea.

- The earth is our home - we should take care of the environment and the beaches as if they were our own living room. We must avoid littering the beach, and we should even pick up other people's rubbish.

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Special Feature: Pasteli

In every peripteron in Greece, you will find a candy bar which is reminiscent of the natural food movement prevalent in the 1980s.  Pasteli, however, is one of the conerstones of Greek confectionery.  The classic pasteli consists simply of sesame seeds baked with honey, and is therefore indigenous to the sesame-growing area around Thessaloniki, but almond, filbert and peanut pasteli have also become increasingly popular and are manufactured nationwide.  This is not surprising in a country that produces such an abundance of nuts.  Almonds grow in rocky regions, filberts and walnuts in agricultural areas and peanuts come from Cyprus.


There are still a good many pasteli bakeries in this, the home region of pasteli.  The aroma emanating from the bakeries can easily make you believe that pasteli may well have something to do with the legendary nectar and ambrosia that found their way here from nearby Olympus.

 
     
 

 

The sesame seeds or peanuts need to be evenly roasted  for pasteli   Boil the honey and sugar until it forms a compact mass.  The firmer the mass, the quicker the pasteli will set.  
     
 

Tip the mixture of sugar and sesame seeds (or peanuts) out onto a flat surface

 

Use a rolling pin to spread the mixture into a thin layer, a process which requires a great deal of skill

 

 

Sesame and Honey Candy Bar  Pasteli Sesame and Honey Candy Bar Pasteli
available at GreekShops.com
Almond Bar (Pasteli with almonds) Almond Bar (Pasteli with almonds)
Try some of our Almond Bar Pasteli.


 

 What's New!!!
Featured New Additions
 
  Costume Jewelry Summer Sale!!

 Save 10% off any item in our costume jewelry section by using coupon COS2006 during check out.
Offer valid only to costume jewelry. Limited time offer; expires 7/31/06

 

Yanni The Collection 3 CD set
Presenting the complete Yanni Collection, a 3 CD set which includes 33 classic Yanni tracks.  Includes the favorites Desire, Santorini, Keys to Imagination, Song for Antartica, In the Morning Light and One Man's Dream.             
More Yanni    

If I Could Tell You

Devotion

Dare to Dream

Live At The Acropolis + bonus DVD

In My Time
   
Olympiakos DVD Collection 7+1 (PAL) and Multiregion DVD Player Bundle Special

Special Offer for all Olympiakos fans! Save over $30 on a Multi-region DVD player and DVD set bundle. Offer available while supplies (you have supplies) last!

 

 

    

   
2007 Calendars are here!

Brighten your year with the many stunning sights of Greece presented in these new 2007 calendars.  Our includes 16-months calendars, starting September of 2006.

 

    

 

Music
Yianna Terzis, Girna To Klidi

Yianna Terzis, Girna To Klidi
Manolis Mitsias, Kivotos / Ark Live (2CD)

Manolis Mitsias, Kivotos / Ark Live (2CD)
 
Apostolia Zoi, Th

Apostolia Zoi, Th'Afisi Epohi
Tha Vro Alli Live (2CD), Matheos Giannoulis and Lefteris Vazeos

Tha Vro Alli Live (2CD), Matheos Giannoulis and Lefteris Vazeos
Konstantina, Ti Bike Anamesa Mas

Konstantina, Ti Bike Anamesa Mas
Giorgos Hristou, Pantou Tha Se Psahno

Giorgos Hristou, Pantou Tha Se Psahno
 
Yanni, Live At The Acropolis + bonus DVD (NTSC)

Yanni, Live At The Acropolis + bonus DVD (NTSC)
OPA OPA Vol.2 16 upbeat chart hits

OPA OPA Vol.2 16 upbeat chart hits
 
Tribute to Vicky Mosholiou, Den Xero Poso S

Tribute to Vicky Mosholiou, Den Xero Poso S'Agapo Live (2CD)
Tote Ke Tora (2CD)

Tote Ke Tora (2CD)
 
Eurovision Song Contest : Athens 2006 (2CD)

Eurovision Song Contest : Athens 2006 (2CD)
 
Ta Athanata Zeibekika (2CD) 35 Classics

Ta Athanata Zeibekika (2CD) 35 Classics
Rebetika Gia Panta (2CD) 36 Classics

Rebetika Gia Panta (2CD) 36 Classics
Greek Lounge 1 songs from Greece & around the world

Greek Lounge 1 songs from Greece & around the world
John Greek 88.6 Ine Se Katasi Zeibekikou

John Greek 88.6 Ine Se Katasi Zeibekikou
Mega Mix 2006 (2CD) 50 non-stop

Mega Mix 2006 (2CD) 50 non-stop
EuroSongs (2CD) from 1974 -2004 all Greek entries since 1974

EuroSongs (2CD) from 1974 -2004 all Greek entries since 1974
Ola Ta Souxe 17 Super Hits

Ola Ta Souxe 17 Super Hits
Megaliteres Epithies Best of Mikis Theodorakis

Megaliteres Epithies Best of Mikis Theodorakis
 
Megaliteres Epitithies Best of Marios Tokas

Megaliteres Epitithies Best of Marios Tokas
 
Megaliteres Epithies Best of Stelios Kazantzidis

Megaliteres Epithies Best of Stelios Kazantzidis
 
Megaliteres Epithies Best of Dimitris Mitropanos

Megaliteres Epithies Best of Dimitris Mitropanos
 
Megaliteres Epithies Best of Vasilis Karras

Megaliteres Epithies Best of Vasilis Karras
Megaliteres Epithies Best of Stratos Dionisiou

Megaliteres Epithies Best of Stratos Dionisiou
 
 
 Books
Poly voutyro sto tomari tou skylou by Giorgos Skampardonis, in Greek

Poly voutyro sto tomari tou skylou by Giorgos Skampardonis, in Greek
 
I arhi tou taftosimou by Eva Omiroli, in Greek

I arhi tou taftosimou by Eva Omiroli, in Greek
 
I agapi den ehei telos by Kostas Karakasis, in Greek

I agapi den ehei telos by Kostas Karakasis, in Greek
The Woman Who Died Twice by Eleftheriou Manos, in Greek

The Woman Who Died Twice by Eleftheriou Manos, in Greek
Me ta ftera tis elpidas by Omiros Avramidis, in Greek

Me ta ftera tis elpidas by Omiros Avramidis, in Greek
Learn Greek, part A, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part A, in Greek, includes CD
 
Learn Greek, part B, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part B, in Greek, includes CD
Learn Greek, part C, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part C, in Greek, includes CD
Learn Greek Three Volumes Set

Learn Greek Three Volumes Set
 
 Beijing 2008 Olympic Pins
Beijing 2008 Panda Pin

Beijing 2008 Panda Pin
 
Beijing 2008 Dragon Pin

Beijing 2008 Dragon Pin
Beijing 2008 Great Wall Pin

Beijing 2008 Great Wall Pin
Beijing 2008 Mask Pin

Beijing 2008 Mask Pin
 

  Featured Destination: Paros-Antiparos

GEOGRAPHY. The third largest island in the Cyclades (after Naxos and Andros), Paros is 195 sq. km. in area, has 118 km. of coast and is 95 nautical miles from Piraeus. There are daily car and passenger ferries from Piraeus and a link with Rafina (daily during the summer, three times a week in winter). There is also a connection with Syros, Naxos, los and Santorini. In the summertime there are links with the Lesser Cyclades, Amorgos, Anaphi, Sikinos, Pholegandros, the Dodecanese and Herakleion in Crete. One route also goes to Samos and Ikaria. There are local services to Naxos, los, Santorini, Mykonos and Siphnos, as well as frequent sailings to and from Antiparos each day. There are daily flights from Athens and in the summer an air link with Rhodes and Herakleion (not very frequent). The island's capital is Paros (Paroikia) with a population of 7,881.

Because the mountainous masses are concentrated in the centre and southeastern part of the island (highest peak Profitis Ilias, 771 m. a.s.l.), there are several flat areas for cultivation and the beaches are easy to reach. There are two natural gulfs, Naoussa in the north and Paroikia on the west side. The mild climate, sandy beaches, picturesque villages with their attractive Cycladic architecture, lovely countryside and well-appointed tourist facilities entice a large number of visitors, sometimes "swamping" the island. For those wanting to spend a cosmopolitan vacation Paros is perfect, while for those seeking solitude and serenity there are still many parts of the island of great natural beauty and "far from the madding crowd" of tourists.

HISTORY. Paros has been inhabited since prehistoric times when the Early Cycladic civilization attained its apogee (3200 - 2100 BC). There was a Late Bronze Age installation on the summit of the hill at Paroikia and, as finds from here indicate, the island was also in contact with Mainland Greece. There followed a period of desolation and the island was resettled at the end of the Mycenaean age, though only sparsely. Minoans, Arcadians, Achaeans all settled on Paros and in around 1000 BC it was colonised by Ionians. In historical times, from the 8th century BC until the Persian Wars, the island experienced a sustained floruit; it was engaged in trading transactions with Miletus in Asia Minor and founded a colony on Thassos. This major acme was due to the quarrying of marble, used in the construction of many ancient temples and the creation of numerous works of art. During the 6th and 5th century BC there was a school of sculpting on Paros (Skopas, Agorakritos) and art and letters flourished. Paros was the home of the 7th century lyric poet Archilochos. The island sided with the Medes during the Persian Wars but later became a member of the Athenian League. It subsequently belonged to the Macedonians and then the Romans. Little is known of its course in the Byzantine period except for snippets of information on piratical raids. In 1207 it was captured by the Venetians and ceded to the Duchy of Naxos until 1389. It was then governed by a succession of families (Crispi, Sommaripa) until it was pillaged by Barbarossa in 1537 and subjugated by the Turks. Between 1770 and 1774 it was the headquarters of the Russian fleet under Orloff and it played an active role in the 1821 Revolution.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS. Paroikia, the island's capital, lies on the west coast and is also its main port. It occupies the same site as the ancient city and its oldest quarter, more or less at the centre of the town, is clustered around the hill of Kastro on the southwest side of the harbour. It is a typical Cycladic town with paved streets, archways ("volts"), dazzling white two-storey houses interspersed with churches and windmills. A road leads from the harbour to the market place ("agora"), at the heart of the town, where all manner of wares may be purchased. The castle or Kastro stands on the highest point of the town, southwest of the harbour. It was built on the site of the ancient acropolis and much of the building material comes from ancient buildings, since column drums and fragments of marble are nowadays visible in the restored sector of the castle. Excavations conducted here have brought to light the ruins of an Archaic temple of Demeter (adjacent to the present church of St. Constantine). There are very few extant remains of the Venetian castle on the east and southeast flank (parts of the wall and a tower). The Byzantine church of St. Constantine is outstanding not only on account of its unique architecture but because of its gilded wood carved iconostasis. In various parts of the town there are handsome mansions belonging to eminent island families, some even with their coat of arms incorporated over the lintel. There are also many tiny churches with wood carved iconostases. However, the most important church of all is that of the Virgin Katapoliani (or Ekatontapyliani) on the northern outskirts of Paroikia. One of the oldest Early Christian basilicae in Greece, it was founded, tradition relates, by either St. Helen or St. Constantine. In the course of the study and restoration of this monument it became apparent that this large church dedicated to the Virgin (feast day August 15th) was built at the end of the 4th century. To right and left are small side chapels and to the south a Baptistry. During the reign of Justinian (6th century) additions were made to the church and it thus acquired the form we see today. There is a Byzantine Museum in one of the buildings in its precinct. The modern building a short distance from the church is the Archaeological Museum, in which are housed finds from the Neolithic to the Roman era. Noteworthy exhibits include vases, sculptures (Skopas' Nike) and a section of the Parian Chronicle (dated to Hellenistic times), found in 1627 built into the enceinte of the castle, on which events in the island's history from 2000 - 264/63 BC are recorded in chronological order. Ancient sanctuaries have been discovered at Delion (sanctuary of Apollo) to the north of the bay, near the cave of Archilochos, on the Kounados hill (sanctuary of Aphrodite and Eileithyia) on the northwest side of the town, while in the southwest are ruins of an Asklepieion.

10 km. northeast of Paroikia is the gulf of Naoussa, the largest on the island. On the way to Naoussa, about 1 km. outside Paroikia, in the locality known as Treis Ekklesies, there are vestiges of an Early Christian basilica and three Byzantine churches, further on is the Longovardas monastery (6 km. from Paroikia), founded in 1638, which has a significant library and icon-painting atelier. Naoussa, with its pristine white houses, Postbyzantine churches (St. Athanasios, St. John the Theologian, the Savior etc.), its monastery (St. George) and the little harbour with the Venetian castle is one of the most beautiful parts of Paros. From here one can visit the villages on the east and south side of the island (there is another road from Paroikia to these villages) Marmara, Marpissa, with its ruined Venetian castle on top of Kefalos hill and the monastery of St. Anthony, Piso Livadi and Drios, Kostos and Lefkes, with its 17th century church of the Holy Trinity. A short way beyond Lefkes is the convent of Thapsana with its miraculous icon of the Virgin Myrtidiotissa. In the locality of Marathi (4 km. from Paroikia) there is an ancient marble quarry. 6 km. from Paroikia is the region of Psychopiana with its verdant vegetation, running water and myriads of butterflies. Not far off is the nunnery of Christ of the Wood (tou Dasous), repository of the shroud of St. Arsenios. This is a convenient place for visiting villages on the south side of the island (Alyki, Angairia, where the airport is located), or to proceed to Pounta from where boats leave for Antiparos. Paros has a large number of beaches, ideal for swimming, fishing and sea sports. At Paroikia: Livadia, Krios, Aghios Phokas; at Naoussa (west side): Mikro and Megalo Piperi, Limnes and Kolymbithres, with its spectacular rock formations, reminiscent of sculptures; on the east side: Aghioi Anargyroi, Xifara, Langeri, Alyki, Santa Maria, Ambelas. All are easily accessible on foot or by bus and car, as well as by small craft which make regular trips, leaving from Paroikia for Krios and Livadia, and from Naoussa for Kolymbithres, Langeri, Santa Maria. There are stretches of sand at Logaras, Piso Livadi, Drios and Alyki. Those with a boat may investigate other beaches, as well as the offshore islets. Refueling stations at Paroikia and Naoussa. Paros has numerous hotels, pensions, furnished apartments and rooms available for a pleasant stay.

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Going to Live and Work in Greece

Going to Live and Work in Greece
2005 edition

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece - A Guide to the Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Greece - A Guide to the
Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Cruise Greece DVD

Cruise Greece DVD

 Saints' Namedays in July

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
          1
Kosma & Damianou
2
3
Yakinthou
4 5 6 7
Kuriakis
8
Theofilou / Prokopiou

9
Pagratiou

10

11
Eufimias / Olgas

 
12
Veronikis
13 14
Nikodimou
 
15 16
Athinogenous
17
Marinas
18
Aimilianou
19 20
Profiti Elia
21 22
Marias Magdalinis
23
24 /31
 
25 26
Parakseuis
 

 
27
Panteleimonos
28 29
Kallinikou


 
30
Iosif Arimatheias


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