January 2007 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: In a Taxi Special Feature : Phyllo Pastry
What's New!!!! Featured Destination : Ios 
Saint Namedays in January January 's Recipe : Artichokes with Butter 
Suggestions & Comments Subscription Information
Ingredients: (Serves 6)
- 6 medium sized artichokes
- 3 tbsp butter
- 3 tbsp chopped onions
- 1 lemon
- 2 tbsp chopped dill
- 1 tbsp flour
- 1 cup water
- Salt & white pepper to taste


Preparation:

Cut off stems 2 inches from leaves, remove outside leaves, and cut off 1 inch from the top. Also remove choke (choke is the feathery center).

Scrape out and peel off coarse parts around the bottoms and the stems. When out of season and artichokes are not so tender, pull off all the leaves and cut off all the stems.

Rub with lemon and soak in salted cold water to prevent them from darkening.

Cut artichokes in half and place in saucepan with the chopped onions, butter, salt, pepper and chopped dill.

Sprinkle with flour.

Add water, cover and simmer for about 40 minutes.

If desired, add
avgolemono sauce
:

2 or 3 eggs
1 or 2 lemons (juice)
1 tbsp cornstarch
1 cup stock or water
 
Beat the eggs.

Add stock or water, cornstarch and lemon juice.

Beat well.
 

Excerpts from:
"Greek Cooker" by Nicholas Tselementes

 
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Watch Your Manners In Greece
In a Taxi

Continued from December's issue...

There are more than 35,000 taxis in Greece. Due to the cheap fares and the fact that they accept more than one hirer (although this is actually illegal), it is a means of transportation similar to buses and trains in other countries. In consequence, their wide use in our country has created a separate set of rules of good manners, which differs from other countries.

The following rules are an indication as to how both drivers and passengers should behave. You may not be surprised to note that hardly any are followed.

A foreigner should know that we hail a taxi from anywhere in a street - we don't necessarily have to be at a taxi stand. The taxi may have other passengers in it, so you must shout out the area of your destination and if the other passengers are going the same way, you'll hop in as a second or third hirer. Remember to check the fare on the meter when you get in.

Tips for taxi drivers

- He must not refuse to accept any passenger, unless he/she is under the influence of drugs or alcohol and is not accompanied by another sober person.

- Booking a taxi in advance is done through radio taxi companies. But, because taxis are so ubiquitous, it is rarely done except for special occasions such as weddings or funerals.

- For the above, taxi drivers must have a confirmation from the hirer in which the specific date, time and location are mentioned.
As far as hiring in advance at ports, airports and railway and bus stations is concerned, the hirer's confirmation must contain his/her name and details of arrival (such as flight number, name of ferry boat, approximate time of arrival).

- Selecting a passenger is not allowed. If the taxi is at a specially chosen area/square, hiring should happen in order of the taxies and passengers' waiting. An exception is made for the blind, handicapped, or pregnant women.

- The taxi driver must always interrupt his driving and park if he is asked to do so by the passenger.  Waiting must be no longer than fifteen minutes, unless there is a very serious reason.

A taxi driver should:
- aways be polite, efficient and helpful towards his passengers.
- help passengers with their luggage.
- take the shortest route for arriving at the ordered destination, unless the passenger wishes to take a different route.
- NOT play loud music or keep the window down, without the hirer's permission. No permission is needed for keeping his own window scrolled down.
- have enough change and must give a receipt if requested.
- give his passenger any information he/she requires (regarding transportation charges, the route etc.)
- NOT accept more passengers than allowed by the car's license.
- keep the vehicle clean, both inside and out.

- A taxi driver is obliged to transport people in need (such as somebody injured), even if he had nothing to do with the accident.

- Many taxi drivers refuse to take pets, especially larger dogs. If the animal is clean, calm, on a lead, wearing a muzzle (if necessary) and accompanied by a health certificate from a veterinarian, it is more likely to be accepted. The dog or cat (in a carrying case) should remain in the vehicle's floor.

- Passengers must avoid any action which may hinder traffic circulation. In particular they should not:
a) Disturb the driver during the vehicle is in motion,
b) Attempt to get in or out of the car while it is moving.
c) Smoke without the driver's permission.
d) Be improperly dressed.
e) Open the windows without the driver's permission.
f) Cause any damage to the vehicle

- The driver must not argue on the road with any other driver, especially with any of his colleagues.

- He must be properly dressed, even during the height of summer: sandals, shorts and sleeveless shirts are unacceptable.

Tips for passengers

- Passengers must always use the door which is on the pavement side of the vehicle.

- If a gentleman is traveling with a lady, he should always hold the taxi's door open for her and let her go in first. She must then sit at the far end of the back seat, so that he may sit next to her. When arriving at the destination, he must get out of the taxi and hold the door open for her, then pay the driver through the window. If they're sharing the fare, she must give him the appropriate amount of money while they're still seated in the cab.

- Out of respect to the vehicle as a public means of transportation, we should not leave rubbish, eat or drink within the vehicle.

- If we are under the impression that we have been overcharged, we must notify the driver. If he refuses to accept the fact, we should ask for his personal details and refer him to the police.

- We shouldn't comment on the driver's way of driving unless we consider it dangerous. If this is the case, we should ask him to slow down and be more careful. If he persists, we should ask him to let us get out of the vehicle.

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis
 


Special Feature: Phyllo Pastry

If you think that you can translate the Greek word fillo, derived from the ancient Greek word phyllo (a leaf) as "puff pastry," then you're close, but not quite correct. Whereas puff pastry contains eggs and its individual layers are separated by cold butter, (which then melts in the oven and helps it puff up nicely), fillo pastry relies on more stability. Its basic ingredients are nothing special. Flour, water, fat, and salt are kneaded until the dough attains the correct consistency: light, but tear-resistant, like strudel pastry. The thin layers are separated with oil instead of butter. The secret of rolling it out lies not only in the skill of the master flllo-pastry maker, but also in the thin wooden rolling pin, which is about 20 inches (50 centimeters) long and perfectly straight, having no handles. These rods guarantee good contact with the pastry and the even pressure that is essential if the fillo is to attain its leaf-like delicacy.

 
Using your hands, combine the flour, vinegar, oil, salt, and water, and knead to form a smooth dough. Then sprinkle the pita dough with flour, cover, and place in a refrigerator for at least 1 hour. It would be impossible to roll out the pastry thin enough without the special, long, thin, wooden rolling pin. The prepared pastry can be rolled out again in the greased baking pan.  The individual layers are brushed with butter.

Bougatsa (fillo pastry with cream filling)

Along with piropita (sheep's milk cheese pita) and spanakopita (spinach pita), sweet bougatsa is another phyllo pastry delicacy more usually found in the pita stalls than in the bakeries with their syrup cakes.  The cream filling makes the pastry rich, so that it is served as a snack in its own right rather than as a dessert, and as such it can take the addition of cinnamon and sugar.

1 1/2 cups fine semolina
1 1/2 generous cups sugar
3 eggs
6 cups milk
Grated zest of 1 unwaxed or well-scrubbe lemon
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp butter
1lb phyllo pastry
Confectioner's sugar
Ground cinnamon

 
Beat the semolina, sugar, and eggs until frothy. Transfer the mixture to a pan and add the milk, stirring constantly. Bring to a boil several times and then stir in the grated lemon zest. Leave to cool. Preheat the oven to 350 of (180 C). Melt the butter and brush over the individual sheets of pastry. Place half the pastry on a greased baking sheet, spread the creamy mixture out evenly on top, and cover with the remaining pastry. Bake in a preheated oven for about 20 minutes until the pastry is golden brown and crispy on top and the filling has set. Leave the bougatsa to cool slightly, then sprinkle with confectioner's sugar and cinnamon and cut into slices. Bougatsa is best eaten while still warm.
In Ioannina, each slice of bougatsa is served with a sweet roll and a glass of water.
 
Pour the prepared cream filling onto the layers of pastry forming the base. Place the cover on the cream filling, building it up gradually layer by layer, and press the excess pastry firmly together. While still warm, dredge the bougatsa with confectioner's sugar and cinnamon, and serve immediately.



The next day, all bougatsa need to make it taste almost oven-fresh is another sprinkling of confectioner's sugar


                                 Excerpt from: "Culinaria Greece" by Marianthi Milona

 

 What's New!!!
Featured New Additions
 


Greek Cookery by Nicholas Tslementes


The name Tselementes has been synonymous with Greek food. In 1910 Nicholas Tselementes a well-known chef from the island of Sifnos wrote the first Greek Cookbook which became every housewife's cooking bible for over sixty years. The book sold over 100,000 copies in 10 editions by the time Tselementes died in 1958.

Through his classic books he taught generations of Greek cooks the finer points not only of traditional Greek cooking but also combinations of Greek and Western European cooking. This is the most recent publication of his original cooking encyclopedia.

 

Discover Greece 6 DVD set (NTSC)

This set of exciting travel DVDs includes:

Discover Greece : Athens
Discover Greece : Rhodes, Kos, Leros, Samos, Chios, Patmos
Discover Greece : Ancient Greece
Discover Greece : Mykonos, Delos, Tinos, Siros, Andros
Discover Greece : Paros, Naxos, Kea, Milos, Kithnos
Discover Greece : Ancient Theatres and Castles

DVDs can also be purchased individually.

 
 
Traditional Onions Cookies imported from Greece

Sugar Free... but full of taste!

A unique line of bakery products that combines taste and inspiration in the most traditional way! Handmade cookies, made from excellent ingredients, completely natural and sugar free.

 

Music
Mihalis Hatziyiannis, Filoi Ke Ehthroi

Mihalis Hatziyiannis, Filoi Ke Ehthroi
Notis Sfakianakis, Kinonia Ora... 7:00

Notis Sfakianakis, Kinonia Ora... 7:00
Mihalis Hatziyiannis, Ola H Tipota CD Single

Mihalis Hatziyiannis, Ola H Tipota CD Single
 
Sakis Rouvas, Iparhi Agapi Edo

Sakis Rouvas, Iparhi Agapi Edo
Themis Adamantidis, Se Proto Plano

Themis Adamantidis, Se Proto Plano
Lefteris Pantazis, Live 2 CD

Lefteris Pantazis, Live 2 CD
 
Tasos Bougas, Kilitses Exo 2CD

Tasos Bougas, Kilitses Exo 2CD
Despina Vandi, Kalanta... CD single 4 Chrismas Hits by Foivos

Despina Vandi, Kalanta... CD single 4 Chrismas Hits by Foivos
 
Pashalis Terzis, Meta Tis 12

Pashalis Terzis, Meta Tis 12
Best of Antonis Remos 3 CD

Best of Antonis Remos 3 CD
Hristos Pazis, De Milas Ti Na Peis

Hristos Pazis, De Milas Ti Na Peis
Andreas Stamos, 11 Stigmes

Andreas Stamos, 11 Stigmes
Hristos Dantis, Min Pis Pote

Hristos Dantis, Min Pis Pote
Kelly Kelekidou, Sigendrosou

Kelly Kelekidou, Sigendrosou
Kolasi 2007

Kolasi 2007
Souxe 2007 18 Hot Hits

Souxe 2007 18 Hot Hits
Heaven 2007 + Bonus DVD (PAL)  20 Super hits

Heaven 2007 + Bonus DVD (PAL) 20 Super hits
 
Minos 2007

Minos 2007
 
Zontana 2  (2CD)

Zontana 2 (2CD)
Ta Pedia Tis Salonikis Vol. 2

Ta Pedia Tis Salonikis Vol. 2
Alithines Istories - CD / DVD

Alithines Istories - CD / DVD
Stelios Kazantzidis, Mai Zoi Stelios - Oi Megales Epitihies CD + Bonus DVD (PAL)

Stelios Kazantzidis, Mai Zoi Stelios - Oi Megales Epitihies CD + Bonus DVD (PAL)
Yiannis Poulopoulos, Oi Megales Epitihies No.2  (2CD)

Yiannis Poulopoulos, Oi Megales Epitihies No.2 (2CD)
Stratos Dionisiou, Gia Panta Live in America 2CD

Stratos Dionisiou, Gia Panta Live in America 2CD
 
Ta Zouzounia Akantou

Ta Zouzounia Akantou
DVDs
Discover Greece : Athens DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Athens DVD (NTSC)
 
Discover Greece : Rhodes, Kos, Leros, Samos, Chios, Patmos DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Rhodes, Kos, Leros, Samos, Chios, Patmos DVD (NTSC)
 
Discover Greece : Ancient Greece DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Ancient Greece DVD (NTSC)
 
Discover Greece : Mykonos, Delos, Tinos, Siros, Andros DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Mykonos, Delos, Tinos, Siros, Andros DVD (NTSC)
 
Discover Greece : Ancient Theatres and Castles DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Ancient Theatres and Castles DVD (NTSC)
 
Discover Greece : Paros, Naxos, Kea, Milos, Kithnos DVD (PAL)

Discover Greece : Paros, Naxos, Kea, Milos, Kithnos DVD (NTSC)
Discover Greece 6 DVD Set (PAL)

Discover Greece 6 DVD Set (NTSC)
 
Ta Zouzounia Akantou - Greek Sing-along-songs on DVD (NTSC)

Ta Zouzounia Akantou - Greek Sing-along-songs on DVD (NTSC)
 
Eternity and a Day DVD (NTSC)

Eternity and a Day DVD (NTSC)
To Livadi Pou Dakrizi (2004) DVD (PAL)

To Livadi Pou Dakrizi (2004) DVD (PAL)
Books
Twice a Stranger by Bruce Clark

Twice a Stranger by Bruce Clark
Divry

Divry's New English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary
Divry

Divry's Modern English-Greek and Greek-English Desk Dictionary
 
Greek Made Easy Third Edition by George C. Divry

Greek Made Easy Third Edition by George C. Divry
Self-Study Learning Greek, in Greek

Self-Study Learning Greek, in Greek
 
The Authentic Tselementes : Greek Cooking Encyclopedia 6-volume set - In Greek

The Authentic Tselementes : Greek Cooking Encyclopedia 6-volume set - In Greek
The Authentic Tselementes : Traditional Everyday Recipes 2 Book Set in Greek

The Authentic Tselementes : Traditional Everyday Recipes 2 Book Set in Greek
The Authentic Tselementes : Desserts, Pastries and Cocktail Recipes 2 Book Set in Greek

The Authentic Tselementes : Desserts, Pastries and Cocktail Recipes 2 Book Set in Greek
The Authentic Tselementes : Holiday Recipes in Greek

The Authentic Tselementes : Holiday Recipes in Greek
 
The Authentic Tselementes : Pasta Recipes in Greek

The Authentic Tselementes : Pasta Recipes in Greek

  Featured Destination: Ios

Geography. To the south of Naxos, between Sikinos and Thera, los (Nios) is 108 sq. km. in area, has 81 km. of coast and is 107 nautical miles from Piraeus. Its capital is los (Chora) with a population of 1,451. There are car and passenger ferry links with Piraeus and the islands of Paros, Naxos, Santorini, Sikinos and Pholegandros, Siphnos, Syros, Anaphi, Herakleion in Crete. During the summer there are regular connections by local craft with Santorini, Paros, Naxos, Mykonos and Teng and daily trips to Sikinos and Pholegandros. A mountainous island (highest peak Pyrgos.. 713 m. a.s.l.) it has no cultivable tracts of land and its coast consists of dozens of tiny bays and three larger ones: Aghia Theodoti in the east, Kalamos in the southwest and Mylopotamos in the west. Its wonderful sandy beaches, crystal clear sea and serene landscape with olive groves and vineyards attract hordes of tourists in quest of tranquility and communion with nature.

History. Mythology relates that the island was first settled by Phoenicians. It is also claimed to be the last resting place of Homer. In historical times it was colonised by Ionians, became a member of the Athenian League and later passed into the hands of the Egyptian Ptolemies. During the Roman period it was a place of exile and in Byzantine times faded into oblivion. From 1207 onwards it belonged to the Duchy of Naxos, was a perpetual victim
of piratical attacks and in 1537 was captured by the Turks. It continued to be a refuge for, corsairs. los participated in the 1821 Struggle for Independence.

Sights-Monuments. los, the island's capital is located in the centre of the west side, overlooking the harbour. It is built on the site of the ancient city and is dominated by the mass of its medieval castle, built in the 14th' century on the same spot as the ancient acropolis. Remnants from ancient structures have been located also in Psathi.

Chora is a typical Cycladic town with dazzling white houses, narrow streets and many, churches, outstanding among which are those' of St. Catherine, erected on the site of the ancient temple of Apollo, the Forerunner, and Sts. Anargyroi. The northern outskirts of Chora are delimited by a series of windmills and from this ridge one has an unimpeded view in all directions: the gulf of Kalamos to the east, the gulf of Aghia Theodoti to the south and the ruins of a medieval castle at Palaiokastro. At Plakoto, on the north coast of the island, is "Homer's Tomb" and the ruins of a Hellenistic tower known as Psaropyrgos. Special attention should be paid to the numerous chapels on the island which, according to local tradition, exceed 300.

The bays and beaches of los -Aghia Theodoti, Psathi, Kalamos, Manganari, Mylopotas, Ormos - are ideal for swimming and fishing and are easily reached by caique. For those with a private boat there are numerous secluded bays but there is no refuelling station on the island. There are plenty of hotels and furnished rooms to cater for the needs of the many visitors.

 Travel & Museum Guides for your trip in the area

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke
Alistair Sawday

Alistair Sawday's Special Places to Stay - Greece
Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean

Cyclades : Discovering the Greek Islands of the Aegean
Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)

Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)
National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)

National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)

 Saints' Name days in January

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1
Agiou Basileiou
 2
Savva
 3  4 5 6
Theofania
7
Synaksi Ioannou
 
8
Dominikis
9 10
Grigoriou Nussis
11
Theodosiou
12 13

14

15

16 17
Antoniou
18
Athanasiou & Kurillou
19
Makariou
20
Eythimiou
21
Maximou / Neofytou / Agnis
22
Anastasiou / Timothetou
23
Agathagellou
 
24
Xenis
25
Grigoriou Theologou / Margaritas
26
Xenofontos
27 28
29
Ignatiou
30
Trion Ierarxon
 
31
Kyrou & Ioannou An/ron
 
       


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
Want to know more about Orthodox Saints?
Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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