December 2005 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: Mobile Phones   Special Feature : Coffee and Conversation
What's New!!! Featured Destination: Kea 
Saint Namedays in December. December Recipe.
Suggestions & Comments. Subscription Information.

Ordering for the Holidays

           Holiday Shopping @ Greekshops.com

Thank you for choosing Greekshops.com for your Holiday shopping. Our staff will ensure that your order is packed and shipped promptly to arrive on time for Christmas. All orders received by December 17, 2005 will not require any special shipping consideration. All orders placed after December 19th may require special mailing services such UPS 3-day Select, UPS 2nd-day, USPS Express Mail, and Next Day Delivery to ensure delivery before Christmas. The last day to place an order for an "in-stock" item (please email/call for availability) to be delivered before the Christmas Holiday is Wednesday December 21, 2005. Please call us for any purchases made past this date requiring pre-Christmas delivery.

December's Recipe:
Stuffed Bell Pepper


  

serves 6
 

Ingredients:
1/4 cup olive oil
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
1 pound ground beef or lamb, or a combination of beef and lamb
One 28-ounce can tomatoes with juice (or one 6 ounce can tomato paste mixed with 3/4 cup water)
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint (optional)
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup uncooked long-grain white rice
6 medium sweet bell peppers
 
1. In a large saute pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and celery and cook until the onion is soft and clear, 3 to 4 minutes.

2. Add the ground meat and brown lightly. Skim the excess fat. Dice the tomatoes and add both the tomatoes and their juice (or tomato paste and water) to the meat. Add the herbs, cinnamon, salt, and pepper and simmer for 5 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Add the rice and simmer until almost all the liquid has been absorbed, 10 to 15 minutes.

3. Preheat the oven to 350F.

4. While the rice and meat mixture is simmering, slice off enough of the stem end of each bell pepper to expose the whole cavity. Reserve the tops. Remove the seeds and ribs from the pepper cavities and rinse with water. Use a spoon to fill each pepper loosely with the meat mixture, leaving room for the filling to expand. Replace the tops. Place the stuffed peppers in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish and pour in water to a depth of about 1/2 inch.

5. Bake, basting every 15 minutes, until the rice in the filling is tender, about I hour. (Add more water if the dish becomes dry, and cover the peppers with aluminum foil if they begin to turn brown.) Serve immediately.
 

Excerpts from: "Cat Cora's Kitchen", by Cat Cora


Are you missing some pices and incredients for your recipe?

 
Watch Your Manners In Greece
Mobile Phones

Continued from November's Issue...

- When telephones were invented in the 19th century, many assumed that they would spell an end to social gatherings and conversation. How wrong they were! Today phones are one of the most important means of human communication, and probably one of greatest inventions of mass production (after television, cars and sliced bread). What was certainly beyond human imagination at that time was the concept of mobile phones.

- Escaping from a smoggy town is easy. One can easily avoid sound pollution, the stock market, or even watching television. However, it is a major accomplishment if one can stay away from a mobile phone. It is not just that we can get reception almost anywhere in Greece, it's that everyone, everywhere, at any time and with any means can use it. Its number of avid supporters increases by the day, showing that mobile phones have already become an irreplaceable aid to our everyday life. Greeks are most outgoing and expressive in their feelings, with an innate tendency to show off, and have turned the mobile phone into an extension of their hands, ears and mouths. Improper use of mobile phones can make us very rude, but they can also help us to keep up a standard of etiquette - for example we can use them to call if we are running late for an appointment. Contemporary "etiquette" suggests a set of rules to ensure that mobile phones become a means for good manners instead of a mere nuisance.

- When invited to somebody's house, it is polite to have our portable phone switched o f it's very rude to use our phone, with a pretentious face on, sinking deeply into the couch. If we're expecting an important phone call, we should inform our host on arrival, apologizing in advance. When our phone rings, we should move into another room and swiftly complete our conversation.

-  In general we should avoid using our phone during all social events, even at our own home. If this is impossible for vocational reasons (in case of doctors, generals, lawyers, reporters, journalists etc) or other reasons, we must move away from the area of social gathering in order to talk.

- If we are in an expensive restaurant and the customer at the next table is incessantly (and annoyingly) using his mobile phone, we shouldn't directly confront him. Instead we should address the waiter in charge and get him politely to ask our noisy neighbor to switch off - or lower the volume of - his phone.

- It's inexcusable to have our mobile phone switched on at the cinema, the theatre or in church. Some public areas (for example the Herodeion concert hall in Athens), demand that we keep our mobile phones turned off. The Megaron Mousikis (Music concert hall in Athens) demand that all mobile phones are kept in the cloakrooms, as if they were dangerous weapons!

- It is rude selectively to reply to our incoming calls. The person on the other end of the line may suspect rejection!

- If we are on a date and our phone rings, we should answer our phone after apologising to our date.

- Withholding our number when calling somebody is most ungentlemanly. We should have nothing to hide. Not everyone enjoys a surprise call.

- The most appropriate time for calling somebody is between 9 o'clock in the morning and 10 o'clock at night, unless we have been given permission to call at any time. The timing is a bit more lenient on weekends

- If we pick up the mobile phone of a friend who happens to be busy, we should ask the caller's name and number, so that our friend may call him/her as soon as he/she is available. It is rude to ask the caller to try again later.

- In conclusion, a mobile phone should be educative and useful like an Aesop's fable and not disturbingly annoying like a riddle.


Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Special Feature: Coffee and Conversation

 
Since the real business of eating does not begin for the Greeks until midday, it is only coffee that gets city dwellers, in particular, through the first hours of the day.  This first cup of mocha coffee is both a reminder and a foretaste of an afternoon ritual.  Vale briki, which means something like "get the coffee pot boiling" is one of the most important phrases to be heard during the course of a Greek day.  Not only does it signal coffee-time, but can also be an out-right invitation for a cozy chat over coffee or even a coffee klatsch to gossip about the various goings-on in the neighborhood.  These get-togethers over coffee have a special social significance in Greece as a means of contact and exchanging news.  Anyone who does not participate of observe the rules will find it difficult to make friends in the community.  The hostess serves the coffee on a tray with some sweet confectionery, and a  
These brass coffee pots allow the heat to be distributed slowly and evenly as the coffee is brought to a boil
glass of chilled water.  Her guests wish her success and happiness before sampling the sweet confectionery, then quenching their thirst with the water and only then reaching for the coffee.  There are rules governing coffee-drinking too: Unlike espresso, mocha coffee is not downed in one go, but sipped deliberately slowly in order to leave the gritty sediment at the bottom of the cup.

 

 
Ground coffee and sugar are spooned into the pot according to personal taste   Using just enough water to fill a coffee cup, pour it onto the coffee and sugar and bring it to a boil
 
The coffee is ready when the froth has risen right up to the brim   Pour the mocha coffee slowly and carefully into the cup, leaving as much of the grounds as possible in the pot

 

These private coffee sessions can include mixed company with men present as well as women.  Sometimes, it is just a women's get-together.  if only men, it is unlikely that they would make the coffee themselves, preferring to have it served to them in the kafenion.  Coffee-making is regarded as women's work.  These are numerous ways of preparing it and sometimes it does not turn out successfully.  there is a saying that you cant hide anything from the mocha, and the maker's mood is reflected in the resulting brew.  There are basically three different ways of preparing mocha coffee: sketos (bitter), metrios (medium-sweet) and glikos (sweet).  To make one cup of mocha coffee, you need one teaspoonful of very finely ground coffee beans.  Add sugar to taste, then a cup of water, and slowly bring it all to a boil in  a special little long handled pot, before carefully pouring the coffee into the cup.  In days gone by, it was placed in glowing embers to heat up.  The coffee sediment must them be given time to settle at the bottom of the cup, a period of waiting which can be filled with cookies and sweet confectionery.

In the 18th century, it was customary for young men, seeking a girl's hand in marriage to be served a cup of mocha coffee by her family.  This was not simply a symbol of the host's hospitality.  if the coffee were sweet, the suitor had every reason to be pleased; if it were bitter, the young man would rise politely, say thank you for the conversation and never be seen again. 
 

Kafes Frape

1 tsp soluble coffee
1 tsp sugar
1 spoonful of fresh cream or canned milk
Ice cubes


Place the coffee, sugar and 1/4 glass of cold water in a shaker and shake vigorously until all the liquid has turned to foam.  The firmer the consistency of the foam, the better the kafes frape will be.

Pour the mixture into a tall tumbler, add a few ice-cubes and top up with cold water.  Add a dash of fresh cream or canned milk and stir with a straw.  Since coffee preferences vary, when you order a kafes frapes, currently mocha's biggest rival, you will be asked how you like it to be made.



                                                                                                                                                                    excerpts from: "Culinaria Greece"

 

 What's New!!!
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Natassa Theodoridou Os Ekei Pou H Kardia Bori Na Antexi 2 CD

Natassa Theodoridou Os Ekei Pou H Kardia Bori Na Antexi 2 CD
Antonis Remos San Anemos CD

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Hristos Dantis Kata Vathos CD

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Elli Kokkinou SEX

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Dimitris Basis Pente Hronia  Tragoudia best of...

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Konstantinos Hristoforou O Giros Tou Kosmou

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Vasilis Papakonstantinou Irodeio 2005 Live (2CD)

Vasilis Papakonstantinou Irodeio 2005 Live (2CD)
Mihalis Hatziyiannis Krifo Fili Limited Edition CD

Mihalis Hatziyiannis Krifo Fili Limited Edition CD
Dionisis Shoinas Pali Edo CD

Dionisis Shoinas Pali Edo CD
Litsa Giagkousi Anexitila Simadia 17 new songs

Litsa Giagkousi Anexitila Simadia 17 new songs
Yianna Terzi Debut single CD

Yianna Terzi Debut single CD
Eleftheria Arvanitaki & Nikos Zoudiaris POSTER...cd single

Eleftheria Arvanitaki & Nikos Zoudiaris POSTER...cd single
Christos Menidiatis St

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Lena Papadopoulou Na Me Thimase 10 new songs

Lena Papadopoulou Na Me Thimase 10 new songs
Vasilis Terlegkas Thermi  Ipodohi

Vasilis Terlegkas Thermi Ipodohi
 
Yiannis Vardis Meta

Yiannis Vardis Meta
C:Real Hilia Hronia CD

C:Real Hilia Hronia CD

Parade of The Athletes by Tiesto CD

Parade of The Athletes by Tiesto CD

Lefteris Pantazis Horeftika Pano Se Trapeziake Pistes 21 best of . . .

Lefteris Pantazis Horeftika Pano Se Trapeziake Pistes 21 best of . . .

Tzeni Vanou Universal Master Collection 16 best of. . .

Tzeni Vanou Universal Master Collection 16 best of.
Videos
Ten Ten Vol. 1 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)

Ten Ten Vol. 1 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)
Ten Ten Vol. 2 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)

Ten Ten Vol. 2 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)
 
Ten Ten Vol. 3 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)

Ten Ten Vol. 3 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)
Ten Ten Vol. 4 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)

Ten Ten Vol. 4 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)
Ten Ten Vol. 5 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)

Ten Ten Vol. 5 DVD (PAL / Zone 2)
Bob the Builder : Unforgettable Christmas - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)

Bob the Builder : Unforgettable Christmas - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)
Bob the Builder 2 - DVD (Pal/ Zone 2)

Bob the Builder 2 - DVD (Pal/ Zone 2)
Bob the Builder : 3 - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)

Bob the Builder : 3 - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)
Bob the Builder 4 - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)

Bob the Builder 4 - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)
Diaskedazoume me ton Barney - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)

Diaskedazoume me ton Barney - DVD (Pal/Zone 2)
O Ilias Tou Dekatoy Ektoy (NTSC)

O Ilias Tou Dekatoy Ektoy (NTSC)
Laterna Ftohia Ke Filtimo - DVD (NTSC)

Laterna Ftohia Ke Filtimo - DVD (NTSC)
O FILOS MOU O LEFTERIS - DVD (NTSC)

O FILOS MOU O LEFTERIS - DVD (NTSC)
   
Books
The Witches of Smirna Tarot Cards with Guide
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The Lord of the Rings Vol. 1, The Fellowship of the Ring, In Greek

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Lord of the Rings Vol. 3, The Return of the King, In Greek

Lord of the Rings Vol. 3, The Return of the King, In Greek
Twenty years of travelling with Panathinaikos, In Greek

Twenty years of travelling with Panathinaikos, In Greek
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The History of Olympiakos, 1925-2000, In Greek
Cooking and Traditions of Zakynthos

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 Children's Books in Greek or in English
Learning about the ABCs with Paki

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3, 2, 1... I count with Rena In Greek

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Greek Baby Einstein Book - Art for little ones

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Beauty and The Beast, In Greek

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Greek Vocabulary and Alphabet Flash Cards, Ages 5 and up

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My First Greek Words - The Shiny book, Ages 1 to 3

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Greek Alphabet Flash Cards, Ages 5 and up

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Gia ola ftaiei o Kourambies, Short Christmas stories in Greek

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I Learn English Words, In Greek and English

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Eddy

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English Vocabulary with Stickers, In Greek

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The Big Book of Transportation Vehicles

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Gold Evil Eye Jewelry
Gold Evile Eye Bracelet 18k

Gold Evile Eye Bracelet 18k
White Gold Evil Eye Bracelet 18k

White Gold Evil Eye Bracelet 18k
Soid Gold Eye Shaped Pendant 393P 18k

Soid Gold Eye Shaped Pendant 393P 18k
Soid Gold 18k Eye Shaped Pendant

Soid Gold 18k Eye Shaped Pendant
Gold Evil Eye Solid Gold Pendant Style 433P

Gold Evil Eye Solid Gold Pendant Style 433P
White Gold Evil Eye Pendant 18k

White Gold Evil Eye Pendant 18k
White Gold Evil Eye Pendant 18k

White Gold Evil Eye Pendant 18k
White Gold Eye with Greek Key Pendant 18k

White Gold Eye with Greek Key Pendant 18k
Blue Evil Eye with Greek Key Pendant

Blue Evil Eye with Greek Key Pendant
 
Parthenon Evil Eye with Greek Key Pendant 18k

Parthenon Evil Eye with Greek Key Pendant 18k
Turqoiuse Evil Eye on 18k Gold Heart

Turqoiuse Evil Eye on 18k Gold Heart
 
Evil Eye Pendant on 18k Solid Gold Base
Evil Eye Pendant on 18k Solid Gold Base
Evil Eye on eye shaped 18k Solid Gold case

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 Food
Sarantis Greek Traditional Grape Preserves

Sarantis Greek Traditional Grape Preserves
 
Iliada Greek Calamata Olive Spread

Iliada Greek Calamata Olive Spread
Iliada Black Olives in Olive Oil

Iliada Black Olives in Olive Oil
Iliada Green Olives in Olive Oil

Iliada Green Olives in Olive Oil
Iliada Kalamata Organic Olives

Iliada Kalamata Organic Olives
Iliada Extra Virgin Olive Oil & Balsamic Vinegar

Iliada Extra Virgin Olive Oil & Balsamic Vinegar
 
Iliada Kalamta Extra Virgin Organic Olive Oil 750ml

Iliada Kalamta Extra Virgin Organic Olive Oil 750ml
Nescafe frappe Shaker

Nescafe frappe Shaker
   
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Hellas Mug

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12 Gods of Olympus Clock

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Faros Soap - Natural Traditional Olive Oil Soap

Faros Soap - Natural Traditional Olive Oil Soap
 
Greece National Team Scarf Replica

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Olympiakos Scarf

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AEK Crest Scarf Replica

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PAO Team Scarf

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PAO Gate 13 Scarf Replica

PAO Gate 13 Scarf Replica
 

  Featured Destination: Kea


GEOGRAPHY
Kea or Tzia is the northernmost island of the Western Cyclades. It is located between Euboia and Kythnos, almost directly opposite Attica, with Makronisos interposed between them. 131 sq. km. in area, 81 km. of coastline, it is 12 nautical miles from Sounion and has 1,618 inhabitants. The capital is loulis (Chora) and its harbor is Korissia (Livadi), from where there is a daily car and passenger ferry service to Lavrion and once a week to Piraeus during the summer season. The only Cycladic island with which there is a link is Kythnos.
A mountainous island, it consists of small valleys leading down to little bays and sandy beaches. Geologically it is the continuation of Sounion. The highest peak is Profitis Ilias (567 m. a.s.l.), almost at the centre of the island. In the northwest part, between the mountainous masses, is the gulf of Aghios Nikolaos, one of the safest natural harbors in the Mediterranean. Very close to Attica and with limited tourist development and road network, it is just the place for a relaxing vacation.

HISTORY Known in antiquity as "Keios" or "Keio", after the mythical hero Keos, the island's present name, Tzia, is a legacy of the Frankish occupation. Finds from excavations at Kephala testify that the island was inhabited in Neolithic times. Karians, Pelasgians and Lelegians also settled here. In historical times it was colonized by Ionians and consisted of four independent cities -loulis, Karthaia, Poieessa, Koresia- all of which flourished. The island sired poets (Simonides, Bacchylides), philosophers (Aristion) and athletes, and the four cities minted their own coinage. Kea fought against the Medes during the Persian Wars and afterwards joined the Athenian League. Kea was an ally of Thebes for a brief spell, then passed to the Macedonians, Ptolemies and, eventually, to the Romans, which heralded its decline. In Byzantine times it belonged to the Thema of the Aegean and immediately after the Fall of Constantinople in 1204 it was ceded to the Venetians. In 1537 Kh. Barbarossa plundered Kea and it was easily conquered by the Turks. Between 1770 and 1774 it was taken by the Russian fleet and in 1781 was the base for the sorties of L. Katsonis.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS The island's capital, loulis (Chora) is built amphitheatrically in the hinterland, 6 km. from the harbor, on the site of the ancient city of that name. Its vernacular Cycladic architecture is totally unspoiled, snow white two-story houses, narrow cobbled streets and innumerable churches dating from the 17th - 19th century, most with wood carved iconostases and important icons (St. Spyridon, Virgin Rematiani, St. John). From the neighborhood of Kastro, where remnants of the Venetian castle are preserved, there is a magnificent view over the sea to the mountains of Attica. Engraved on a schistose rock northeast of Chora (approx. 1 km.) is the "Lion of Kea", a colossal lion dated to 600 BC, work of an Ionian sculptor and associated with the island's mythology. In the Archaeological Museum one can see finds from excavations conducted on the island, especially from Aghia Irini. 6 km. southwest of Chora, is the monastery dedicated to Aghia Marina, built in the 16th century around a three-storey Hellenistic tower, the ruins of which are still preserved. 2 km. beyond Aghia Marina is Poises with its sparse remnants of the once important city of
Poieessa. This richly vegetated region is delightful for swimming, with its tiny bay and sandy beach. The road from here leads to the bay of Koundouros, one of the most beautiful on the island, with deep blue waters, many beaches and coves. There are several hotels and in the last few years the area has developed touristically. Proceeding eastwards from Chora, one may visit Aghia Anna, formerly a monastery, though nowadays only the church is still in good condition. Southeast of Chora (approximately 12 km.) in an area of particular scenic beauty, difficult of access, is the site of the ancient city of Karthaia.

The site of ancient Koressia is also the site of the modern town known as Livadi by the locals. Excavations conducted here have brought to light sections of the ancient wall and a cemetery in which the statue of an Archaic kouros of the 6th century BC was discovered, nowadays exhibited in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. About 2 km. from Koressia is the picturesque bay of Vourkari, with the tiny village of that name, a safe anchorage for yachts throughout the year. On the Aghia Irini peninsula opposite, excavations carried out by the American School of Classical Studies (under the Direction` of the late professor John Caskey) have revealed an important Bronze Age settlement, at its zenith between 2000 and 1400 BC. In addition to the various buildings, many of which are in the sea, significant movable finds have been recovered: vases, domestic objects and Cycladic figurines. After Vourkari is the gulf of Otzias from where a road leads to the monastery of the Virgin Kastriani (16 km. east of Chora). Within the monastery is the two-storey church of the Virgin, the lower section of which (an 18th century building) is dedicated to the finding of the miraculous icon kept there. On August 15th, the feast of the Virgin, pilgrims flock to the monastery. In addition to the bay of Koundouros and Poises in the south, there are fine beaches at Koressia, Yaliskari and Otzia which can all be reached by bus or car. For those with a boat there are numerous secluded beaches with sparkling sea. Refuelling stations at Koressia and Bourkari. There are a few hotels and rooms for rent.

 

 Travel Guides and Information for your trip in the area


Going to Live and Work in Greece

Going to Live and Work in Greece
2005 edition

Let

Let's Go Greece 2005 edition - 20% off

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece Road Map Set - 10 maps

Greece - A Guide to the Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Greece - A Guide to the
Archaeological Sites - Travel Guide

Cruise Greece DVD

Cruise Greece DVD

 Saints' Namedays in December

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
      1
Theoklitou
2
Muropis
3 4
Varvaras
 5
Savva
6
Nikolaou
7
Amvrosiou
8 9
Agias Annis
10
 

11

12
Spuridonos

13
Eustratiou /
Loukias
14 15
Eleutheriou
16 17
Daniel /
Dionysiou
Zakunthou
 
18
Sevastianou &
Zois
19
Aglaias
20
Ignatiou
21
Themistokleous
22
Anastasias
23 24
Eugenias
25
CHRISTMAS DAY
26
Emmanouil /
Synaksi
Theotokou
27
Stefanou
28

 
29 30 31


 
 


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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