August 2006 Newsletter
 This Month 
Watch Your Manners in Greece: On A Boat (part I) Special Feature : Appetizer Culture
What's New!!!! Featured Destination: Naxos 
Saint Namedays in August August 's Recipe : Pasta Sokilatina 
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August's Recipe:
Pasta Sokolatina

      
 
 
Ingredients:
For the dough
- 3 cups / 350g all-purpose flour
- 1 tsp baking powder
- 1 1/2 cups 350g sugar
- 1 scant cup / 200g margarine
- 2 1/4 cups / 250 g cocoa
- 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
- 3 tbsp / 50ml milk
- 6 eggs
- 1/4 tsp almond extract
- 1Seeds of 1 Vanilla bean
 
For the filling
- 3 egg yolk
- 3 tbsp brandy
- 3 tbsp butter
- 2 tbsp milk
- 8 oz / 200g chocolate cake glaze, melted
- 3 generous cups / 350 g confectioner's sugar
- 2 cups / 500 ml heavy cream, whipped until firm
 
for decoration:
- grated chocolate
- chocolate leaves

Preparation:
Preheat the oven to 345F (175C). Mix all the dough ingredients.  Put the mixture into a greased and floured cake pan about 12 inches / 30 cm in diameter.  Bake for about 1 hour.  Meanwhile melt the chocolate glaze in a bain-marie or according to maker's instructions.  Mix the egg yolks, brandy, butter, and milk, and add to the chocolate.  Sift over the confectioner's sugar and work the ingredients into a smooth paste.  Remove from the bain-marie to allow to cool.  Remove the cake from the oven, place on a wire rack to cool, then cut horizontally into three rounds of equal thickness.  Place one on a serving plate and spread on half the chocolate cream.  Put on the second round and cover with the whipped cream.  Put on the third round, and spread the rest of the chocolate cream on top and down the sides.  Sprinkle with grated chocolate and decorate with the leaves.  Keep cool until serving.
 
Excerpts from: "The Philosopher's Kitchen" by Francine Segan
Watch Your Manners In Greece
On A Boat (part I)

- Greece is closely related to the sea; its length of coastline (15,000km) and the fact that no geographical point within the country is further than 100km from the beach make sea excursions as popular as ouzo and olive oil. From luxury cruisers to fishing trawlers, there are many different kinds of boats, but this chapter is aimed towards those cruising on a motor yacht or sailing boat.

- Life on a yacht may be compared to a "big brother" reality show. It is almost impossible to find any privacy. Seclusion and the co-existence of many people in a limited space often lead to tension and quarrelling. There are scores of examples of married couples and friends falling out during a supposedly idyllic cruise in the Aegean Sea.

- A major reason to avoid a boat is fear of the sea or seasickness. In the 19th century, the French duchess of Montmorancy crossed the English Channel on a visit to a friend. The weather was so dire during her trip that she remained in England for the rest of her life, refusing ever to travel on a ship again.

- If sea travel bothers us but we decide still to punish ourselves by daring to embark on such an excursion, there is no reason to punish our fellow travelers as well. If we feel nauseous, we should avoid nervous breakdowns and "end of the world" panic attacks.

- We should avoid bringing our pet on board. Animals may shed hairs and scratch the boat's floor. If you think your dog will enjoy it, and the boat's owner is agreeable, however, you could try a short trip. After all, one can always put socks on the dog's paws!

- If we enter foreign waters (Turkish, for instance) we must hail the country's flag on the right side of the boat, which means we are visitors. If someone on board is ill, or for any other reason we need to dock at a foreign port, we must ask permission from the port authorities and anchor at the nearest bay. We must check-in with our passports.

- Security is very intense nowadays in the Aegean. The port authorities or coast guards may stop us, especially if we are traveling by night.

Tips for a good host

- The host will "suffer" most of all, since he must co-ordinate and satisfy the demands and caprices of his guests.

- He should not invite more people than the boat can sleep, as this causes arguments like "Why should I sleep on the sofa, and she on the bed?"

- He must carefully pick his guests - they must match and not have a history of previous arguments.

- Before sailing, the host must be informed about the weather conditions from a valid source, and makes sure that the engine has been thoroughly checked.

- If he does not wish pets on board, the host makes this clear as soon as he invites his guests.

- The host avoids having loud music playing when docked. Neighboring boats and people may wish to rest in peace.

- It is not wrong or shaming to ask guests to do things on board.

- The host must help ladies and the elderly embark and disembark.

- He greets any other ship or boat which is nearby.

...to be continued...

Excerpt from "Watch Your Manners In Greece" by Christos K. Zampounis

 
Special Feature: Appetizer Culture


For a Greek restaurant, its appetizers, or starters, Mezedes, are a kind of visiting card.  Through its mezes, the restaurant demonstrates just what its kitchen can do.  After all, the whole range of foodstuffs - meat, fish, vegetables, and dairy products - is available for use in Greek appetizers.  They range from the simple and refined to the brilliantly creative, and quite often reflect the main courses.  They can be eaten hot of cold and may be just the introduction or the main course itself - whatever the customer chooses.

In the cities especially around midday the great army of office workers is drawn in little groups to the countless small restaurants that have opened up in recent years, hidden among the rows of houses, and that have now become sought-after addresses.  In the mezedopolio, a shop selling nothing but mezes as far as the eye can see, there will certainly be something to suit every taste.  Ouzo, the Greek anise-flavored schnapps, is a constant accompaniment to all mezedes.  Drunk with ice, water, or straight, its task is to reinforce the appetizing sensation aroused by the mezedes.  "Appetite making" is, after all, the meaning of the word mezes, which comes from Turkish.  Appetizers certainly do that, but if you are not careful, they manage to do something else as well; they make you feel much too full much too quickly, just because you are longing to try a bit of everything.  You can always tell experienced connoisseurs of mezedes by the restrained way their forks pick up, say a piece of squid, then a potato, perhaps an olive next or maybe a small meatball.  In between people chat, break off a piece of break, sip their glass of ouzo, have a drink of water, and generally take their time.  Where people dine in groups, all selecting uninhibitedly from the dishes, something of the original rural Greece has obviously survived, as in the past whole villages would demonstrate and renew their social solidarity through similar forms of communal eating. 

The difference regions of Greece reveal the characteristics of their cuisine not least in the selection and preparation of the typical local mezedes.  So the mezes must definitely be seen as a kind of ambassador.  For example, in the areas which were once strongly Ottoman, oriental influences predominate, while a western fragrance permeate those parts of the country which were formerly under Venetian sovereignty.  On the Greek islands, the selection of mezedes is still determined by what is produced on each island, and on the mainland, appetizers have a stronger taste than in the south of Greece.  They whole variety of Greek mezedes can be seen gathered together in the big cities, where the host's origins and the preferences of his regular customers are the deciding factors.  And they are available from morning till night, because Greek appetizer culture is a round-the-clock affair.  Mezedes will be available at any time of the day, even if you arrive at 11 p.m.
 

 What's New!!!
Featured New Additions
 
M Magazine : Volume 2, Issue 5. July-August 2006

M Shareholders in Hellenism, is an international bilingual (English & Greek) magazine that promotes Hellenism worldwide.

M offers its readers a blend of content that focuses on business, culture, history, and lifestyle. M magazine is a tool that provides its readers the opportunity to explore Hellenism through in-depth features and unique photographs, along with profiling Hellenic descent personalities that are making headlines in the international community.

 

Music
Haris Alexiou, Vissino Ke Nerantxi - Sour Cherry & Bitter Orange

Haris Alexiou, Vissino Ke Nerantxi - Sour Cherry & Bitter Orange
Thanos Petrelis, Eftihos CD Single

Thanos Petrelis, Eftihos CD Single
Sarbel, Sahara

Sarbel, Sahara
Minos Kalokeri 2006 19 Hot Chart Hits

Minos Kalokeri 2006 19 Hot Chart Hits
Kalokeri 2006 18 Super Chart Hits

Kalokeri 2006 18 Super Chart Hits
40 Non-Stop Mix Vol.2 by Nikos Halkousis

40 Non-Stop Mix Vol.2 by Nikos Halkousis
 
Mega Mix 2006 (2CD) 50 non-stop

Mega Mix 2006 (2CD) 50 non-stop
EuroSongs (2CD) from 1974 -2004 all Greek entries since 1974

EuroSongs (2CD) from 1974 -2004 all Greek entries since 1974
Ola Ta Souxe 17 Super Hits

Ola Ta Souxe 17 Super Hits
This is the Best Music from Crete

This is the Best Music from Crete
 Books & Greek Language CDs
Poly voutyro sto tomari tou skylou by Giorgos Skampardonis, in Greek

Poly voutyro sto tomari tou skylou by Giorgos Skampardonis, in Greek
I arhi tou taftosimou by Eva Omiroli, in Greek

I arhi tou taftosimou by Eva Omiroli, in Greek
 
I agapi den ehei telos by Kostas Karakasis, in Greek

I agapi den ehei telos by Kostas Karakasis, in Greek
The Woman Who Died Twice by Eleftheriou Manos, in Greek

The Woman Who Died Twice by Eleftheriou Manos, in Greek
Me ta ftera tis elpidas by Omiros Avramidis, in Greek

Me ta ftera tis elpidas by Omiros Avramidis, in Greek
Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke

Around Greece in 80 Stays by Jacoline Vinke

 
Alistair Sawday

Alistair Sawday's Special Places to Stay - Greece
Who Killed George Polk? : The Press Covers Up a Death in the Family

Who Killed George Polk? : The Press Covers Up a Death in the Family
Legacy of Courage : A Holocaust Survival Story in Greece

Legacy of Courage : A Holocaust Survival Story in Greece
Pimsleur Conversational Modern Greek - CDs

Pimsleur Conversational Modern Greek - CDs
Learn Greek Three Volumes Set

Learn Greek Three Volumes Set
Learn Greek, part A, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part A, in Greek, includes CD
 
Learn Greek, part B, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part B, in Greek, includes CD
Learn Greek, part C, in Greek, includes CD

Learn Greek, part C, in Greek, includes CD

 
 Greek Sheet Music
Dimitris Lagios - O Ilios O Iliatoras - for Guitar

Dimitris Lagios - O Ilios O Iliatoras - for Guitar
 
Yiannis Markopoulos - Zavara-Katra-Nemia-Lengo - for guitar

Yiannis Markopoulos - Zavara-Katra-Nemia-Lengo - for guitar
Stravros Xarhakos - Collection for Guitar Vol. 1

Stravros Xarhakos - Collection for Guitar Vol. 1
Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 1

Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 1
Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 2

Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 2
 
Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 3

Manos Hadjidakis - Collection for Guitar Vol. 3
 
Thanos Mikroutsikos - 14 songs - Classical Guitar

Thanos Mikroutsikos - 14 songs - Classical Guitar
 
Album - for Guitar Vol. 1

Album - for Guitar Vol. 1
Album - for Guitar Vol. 2

Album - for Guitar Vol. 2
Album - for Guitar Vol. 3

Album - for Guitar Vol. 3
Tsitsanis Vassilis - Album Gia Kithara - Classical Guitar

Tsitsanis Vassilis - Album Gia Kithara - Classical Guitar
Theodorakis - Erotikos Theodrakis Gia Kithara - for Strings

Theodorakis - Erotikos Theodrakis Gia Kithara - for Strings
Nikos Portokaloglou - Collection 1982-1992 - Piano / Keyboard / Guitar

Nikos Portokaloglou - Collection 1982-1992 - Piano / Keyboard / Guitar
 
Plessas Oi Megalitere Epitihies - Composers

Plessas Oi Megalitere Epitihies - Composers
Tsitsanis Album No1 - for Piano

Tsitsanis Album No1 - for Piano
Portokaloglou Nikos - Dipsa - Composers

Portokaloglou Nikos - Dipsa - Composers
 
Dimitra Galani - Ano Telia - Books on Music

Dimitra Galani - Ano Telia - Books on Music
 
Giorgos Sioras - The Songs of Our Country - for Voice / Choral

Giorgos Sioras - The Songs of Our Country - for Voice / Choral
Stravros Palias - The Golden Book of Bousouki

Stravros Palias - The Golden Book of Bousouki
Album - for Bouzouki No.1 with Tablature

Album - for Bouzouki No.1 with Tablature
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Low-Fat Lies High-Fat Frauds and the healthiest diet in the world   SALE

Low-Fat Lies High-Fat Frauds and the healthiest diet in the world SALE
 
Fit for Fate: A Tale of Byzantine Intrigue In Modern Athens   Sale 35% off

Fit for Fate: A Tale of Byzantine Intrigue In Modern Athens Sale 35% off
Novel Still Life in Crete   Clearance 35% off

Novel Still Life in Crete Clearance 35% off
 
Astoria - A Modern Greek Odyssey DVD (NTSC)   Clearance 25% off

Astoria - A Modern Greek Odyssey DVD (NTSC) Clearance 25% off
 
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Novel The Man with the Black Worrybeads Clearance 35% off
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Olympiakos DVD Collection 7+1 (PAL)   Clearance 40% off

Olympiakos DVD Collection 7+1 (PAL) Clearance 40% off
Eurobasket Belgrade 2005  7 DVD set (PAL)   Clearance 30% off

Eurobasket Belgrade 2005 7 DVD set (PAL) Clearance 30% off
Euro 2004 - H Episimi Anaskopisi the UEFA Official Review DVD (PAL/ Region 2) 35% Off

Euro 2004 - H Episimi Anaskopisi the UEFA Official Review DVD (PAL/ Region 2) 35% Off

 
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  Featured Destination: Naxos

GEOGRAPHY. Naxos, in the midst of Mykonos, Amorgos and Paros, is not only the largest island in the Cyclades but also the most fertile. 428 sq. km. in area. 148 km. of coast, 103 nautical miles from Piraeus. There are car and passenger ferry links with Piraeus, as well as Paros, los and Santorini. Regular communications with Syros, Sikinos, Amorgos, Anaphi, Pholegandros and Herakleion (Crete) (less frequent during the winter). Car ferries from Rafina link the island with Paros, Syros, Tenos and Amorgos (infrequent). There is also a local boat service operating between Mykonos, los, Santorini, Siphnos and Seriphos and even with Amorgos, Schinousa, Herakleia, Kouphonisia and Donousa. Excursions by caique to Paros are also organized. The island's capital, Naxos (Chora) has a population of 14,037. Though a mountainous island (highest peak Za, 1004 m. a.s.l., the highest summit in the Cyclades), there are extensive tracts of flat land since the mountainous massifs are concentrated in the eastern and southern part of the island, which is also the most sparsely populated. In addition to its agricultural produce, Naxos has considerable mineral, wealth (marble, granite, emery). Its green landscape, numerous sandy beaches, picturesque villages and abundance of archaeological and historic monuments attract many visitors, particularly those to whom an enjoyable vacation includes hikes and rambles. Whereas tourist facilities are good in Chora, they are somewhat rudimentary in the hinterland, as is the road network.

HISTORY. Tradition relates that Naxos was first settled by Thracians, bringing with them their cult of Dionysos. They were succeeded by Karians and Ionians. From the plethora and wealth of finds from excavations (Grotta), Naxos was evidently the centre of the Cycladic civilization (3200 -2100 BC), it was inhabited in Mycenaean times (Aplomata) and during the period of Ionian colonization (circa 1000 BC) it experienced yet another floruit, culminating in the 7th and 6th century BC. It fought against the Persians in the Persian Wars, became a member of the Athenian League and subsequently passed to the Macedonians, Egyptian Ptolemies, Rhodians and, finally, the Romans. Raids by pirates were so frequent in Byzantine times that the inhabitants withdrew to its interior for protection and built reconnaissance towers from which they repelled the attackers. In 1207 Marcos Sanudos captured the island, establishing it as seat of the Duchy of Naxos and the Archipelago. In 1537 it was laid waste by Barbarossa, from 1566-67 it belonged to Joseph Naze and, eventually, capitulated to the Turks. It was liberated along with the rest of the Cyclades.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS. Chora, the main town, is built on the west side of the island and is one of the most beautiful Cycladic towns, including monuments from all eras. On a tiny islet at the entrance to the harbor stands a large gateway (pyle) known as "Portara", which belonged to the incomplete Archaic temple of Apollo (6th century BC), purported to be Ariadne's palace in popular tradition. In Byzantine times a three-aisled basilica was erected here, which was destroyed by Turkish invaders in 1344 and was never rebuilt. The dominant feature of Chora, with its steep streets and old houses (sometimes three-storied), with significant wall-paintings and, to the east, the Venetian tower of the Barozzi, property of the Gratsias family. Other noteworthy churches are the Virgin Damniotissa (at Kaloxylo) and St. Nicholas at Akadimoi, where the Makropolitis tower also stands. At Moni (4 km. northeast of Chalki) stands the Byzantine church of the Virgin Drosiani (6th century), the oldest on the island. North of Chalki are the churches of St. Isidoros, the Virgin Rachidiotissa and the ruins of the Catholic monastery of St. Francis. West of Chalki are the ruins of the Venetian Ano Kastro (upper castle) (circa 1250). There are ruined Venetian towers at Potamia, as well as the church of St. Mamas (9th Century). The road from Chalki leads to the village of Filoti with its church of the Virgin (Dormition). On one of the peaks of mount Za, southwest of Filoti, is the Za cave or cave of the Bacchae, an ancient cult centre where, legend has it, Zeus was born. 7 km. east of Filoti is the village of Danakos and 4.5 km. northeast is the lovely village of Apeirathos with its markedly Venetian aspect in the architecture of the houses and the towers of the Sommaripa, Crispo and SfortzaKastri. In the local museum there is a significant collection of finds from the area, mainly of the Early Cycladic period. A short distance from the village are the churches of the Theologian (14th century), St. Kyriaki (9th century) and the Virgin (13th century).

There are equally charming villages to the southwest of Chora, with windmills and places of interest. At Glinado there is the church of St. George, while west of Tripodes is the church of St. Matthew and the ruined tower (Palaiopyrgos) of Plaka. Further south, near the coast, is Polichni, where there are traces of a prehistoric installation, as well as of a Venetian tower. The towers of Sammaripa, Della Rocca, Palaiologos and Barozzi at Sangri, the Byzantine churches of the Sts. Anargyroi, St. John on the site of the ancient sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone, St. Eleftherios, the Virgin Kaloritissa in the east and St. Nicholas in the south (10th/13th century), the Virgin Arkouliotissa and Sts. Akindynos and George all merit attention. South of Sangri is the ruined medieval Apalyros castle. Southeast is the impressive Cheimarros tower, which can be reached from Filoti. At Korfari ton Amygdalion in the gulf of Panormos, on the southeast coast, remnants of a fortified prehistoric settlement (2400-2300 BC) have been found.
In the village of Galini on the east side of the island, between Chora and Engares, is the Ypsili monastery, a fortified tower built by lakovos Kokkos in 1600. There is a preserved Venetian tower at Kourounochori, from where the road leads south to Kinidaros, where there was a temple of Artemis. North of the village, at Florio, there is a half-finished Archaic kouros (6th century BC). One reaches the northeast side of the island via the road from Apeirathos, visiting the villages of Koronos, Skado, Komiaki and Apollonas, where there is a colossal, unfinished statue of a kouros in the form of Apollo (7th century BC) "in situ" on the ground. At Kalogeros, even further south, there is a ruined medieval fortress.

The best beaches are on the west side of the island: Aghios Prokopis, Mikri Vigla, Kastraki, Alykos, Pyrgaki, Ayassos with fine golden sand. Those on the east side Apollonas, Psili Ammos and Panormos and in the north Pachela Ammos, Chilia Vrysi and Abrami, only accessible by private car or boat, are suitable for swimming and fishing. There are buses from Chora to all the beaches; the road to Panormos is unmetalled. Accommodation is available in several hotels, pensions, rented rooms and apartments. If one has a boat there are any number of small coves to discover. In the island's interior it is also possible to shoot birds and small game (northeast and southwest side) in season.
 

 

 Museum Guides for your trip in the area

Macedonia - History, Monumnets, Museums (in English)

Macedonia - History, Monumnets, Museums (in English)
Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)

Athens - History, Momuments, Museums (in English)
National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)

National Museum - Illustrated Guide to the Museum (in English)
The Acropolis (in English)

The Acropolis (in English)
 
Knossos - A Complete Guide to the Palace of Minos (in English)

Knossos - A Complete Guide to the Palace of Minos (in English)

 Saints' Namedays in August

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
  1 2 3 4 5 6
Holy Transfiguration of Our Lord Jesus Christ
7 8 9 10 11 12

13

14

15
Dormition of the Theotokos
Assumption Day
16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24
Cosmas of Aitola
25 26
Martyrs Adrian and Natalia
27
Martyr Phanourius
28
 
29 30
Apodosis of the Forerunner

 
31  

 
 


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays.
Shop among our great collection of icons at our store. Also available, namedays, birthday, holiday, and special occasion greeting cards.

Gold and Silver Icons Hand Painted Icons Icons by Zafiris
Gold and Silver Icons
 
Hand painted Icons
 
Icons by Zafiris
 
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